Evaluation of a method to estimate the point prevalence of cognitive impairment and delirium in a multi-campus Australian health service

Penelope Casey, Pēteris Dārziņš, Melinda Webb-St Mart, Cathryn Baldwin, Kath Riddell, Claire Johnson, Wendy Cross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To design, test (pilot) and implement a study to estimate the point prevalence of cognitive impairment (CI) and delirium in a multi-site health service. Methods: Clinicians were trained to use the 4 A's Test (4AT) to screen for cognitive impairment and delirium, and the 3-minute Diagnostic Interview for the Confusion Assessment Method (3D-CAM) to detect delirium in those with abnormal 4AT results. Outcomes of interest were as follows: (a) rates of cognitive impairment and delirium and (b) feasibility of the approach measured by participation rate, “direct survey activity” time, cost and surveyor preparation. Results: The rates of cognitive impairment and delirium were 43.8% (245/559) and 16.3% (91/559), respectively. 90.5% (563/622) of eligible adult patients from 25 acute and subacute wards were seen. “Direct survey activities” averaged 14 minutes (range 2-45) and cost $11.48 per patient. Training evaluation indicated additional education in the 4AT and 3D-CAM was needed. Conclusion: Health services could use this streamlined, inexpensive method to estimate the point prevalence of cognitive impairment and delirium.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)258-266
Number of pages9
JournalAustralasian Journal on Ageing
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2019

Keywords

  • adult
  • cognitive impairment
  • delirium
  • prevalence

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