Ethnic diversity and poverty

Sefa Awaworyi Churchill, Russell Smyth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine the relationship between ethnic diversity and poverty for a cross-sectional sample of developing countries. We measure diversity using indices of ethnic and linguistic fractionalization, and measure poverty using the multidimensional poverty index (MPI), multidimensional poverty headcount (MPH), intensity of deprivation, poverty gap, and poverty headcount ratio. We find that ethnic and linguistic fractionalization contributes to poverty levels. Specifically, after controlling for endogeneity, we find that a standard deviation increase in ethnic fractionalization is associated with a 0.32-, 0.44- and 0.53-standard deviation increase in the MPI, MPH and the intensity of deprivation, respectively. Moreover, a standard deviation increase in ethnic fractionalization is associated with between a 0.34- and 0.63-standard deviation increase in the population living below $1.90 and $3.10, the poverty gap at $1.90 and $3.10 a day and the headcount ratio at $1.90 and $3.10 a day. Similar results are also observed for linguistic fractionalization with standardized coefficients between 0.53 and 0.93. We find that our results are robust to alternative ways to measure poverty and ethnic diversity including ethnic polarization as well as alternative approaches to address endogeneity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)285-302
Number of pages18
JournalWorld Development
Volume95
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2017

Keywords

  • Ethnic diversity
  • Fractionalization
  • Polarization
  • Poverty

Cite this

Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa ; Smyth, Russell. / Ethnic diversity and poverty. In: World Development. 2017 ; Vol. 95. pp. 285-302.
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Ethnic diversity and poverty. / Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa; Smyth, Russell.

In: World Development, Vol. 95, 07.2017, p. 285-302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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