Ethics Simulation in Global Health Training (ESIGHT)

Shunei Asao, Brett Lewis, James D Harrison, Marcia Glass, Tina Penick Brock, Madhavi Dandu, Phuoc Le

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Introduction: Many health care trainees and providers have reported feeling unprepared for the ethical dilemmas they faced while practicing in global health. Simulation is an effective teaching modality in the training of health care professionals.This resource describes the development, implementation, and assessment of an innovative simulation training program for global health ethics.

Methods: We conducted simulation training with trainees and professionals from various health care disciplines. After a didactic component in which general ethical principles were introduced, participants acted as either lead or observer in four simulations representing different ethical challenges. Participants interacted with simulated patients within a set designed to resemble a resource-constrained environment. Data on the participants’ experiences and evaluations of the program’s effectiveness were collected through pre-/post session surveys and focus groups.

Results: All 53 participants (100%) agreed that the simulations “effectively highlighted ethical dilemmas I could face abroad,”and 98% agreed that the content “was useful in my preparation for an international elective.” Responses from surveys and focus groups stressed the importance of the realistic and emotional nature of the simulation in increasing confidence and preparedness, as well as a preference for simulation as the modality for teaching global health ethics.

Discussion: Simulation for global health ethics training can help to raise awareness of the complex ethical challenges one may face abroad.Incorporating simulation training within broader global health curricula can improve trainee preparedness and confidence inappropriately and effectively identifying, strategizing, and navigating through ethical dilemmas in the field.
Original languageEnglish
Article number10590
Number of pages9
JournalMedEdPORTAL
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Asao, S., Lewis, B., Harrison, J. D., Glass, M., Brock, T. P., Dandu, M., & Le, P. (2017). Ethics Simulation in Global Health Training (ESIGHT). MedEdPORTAL, 13, [10590]. https://doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10590
Asao, Shunei ; Lewis, Brett ; Harrison, James D ; Glass, Marcia ; Brock, Tina Penick ; Dandu, Madhavi ; Le, Phuoc . / Ethics Simulation in Global Health Training (ESIGHT). In: MedEdPORTAL. 2017 ; Vol. 13.
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Asao, S, Lewis, B, Harrison, JD, Glass, M, Brock, TP, Dandu, M & Le, P 2017, 'Ethics Simulation in Global Health Training (ESIGHT)' MedEdPORTAL, vol. 13, 10590. https://doi.org/10.15766/mep_2374-8265.10590

Ethics Simulation in Global Health Training (ESIGHT). / Asao, Shunei ; Lewis, Brett ; Harrison, James D; Glass, Marcia ; Brock, Tina Penick; Dandu, Madhavi ; Le, Phuoc .

In: MedEdPORTAL, Vol. 13, 10590, 2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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