Ethical questions must be considered for electronic health records

Merle Patricia Spriggs, Michael Arnold, Christopher Pearce, Craig Lindsay Fry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

National electronic health record initiatives are in progress in many countries around the world but the debate about the ethical issues and how they are to be addressed remains overshadowed by other issues. The discourse to which all others are answerable is a technical discourse, even where matters of privacy and consent are concerned. Yet a focus on technical issues and a failure to think about ethics are cited as factors in the failure of the UK health record system. In this paper, while the prime concern is the Australian Personally Controlled Electronic Health Record (PCEHR), the discussion is relevant to and informed by the international context. The authors draw attention to ethical and conceptual issues that have implications for the success or failure of electronic health records systems. Important ethical issues to consider as Australia moves towards a PCEHR system include: issues of equity that arise in the context of personal control, who benefits and who should pay, what are the legitimate uses of PCEHRs, and how we should implement privacy. The authors identify specific questions that need addressing.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)535 - 539
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Medical Ethics
Volume38
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Cite this

Spriggs, Merle Patricia ; Arnold, Michael ; Pearce, Christopher ; Fry, Craig Lindsay. / Ethical questions must be considered for electronic health records. In: Journal of Medical Ethics. 2012 ; Vol. 38, No. 9. pp. 535 - 539.
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Ethical questions must be considered for electronic health records. / Spriggs, Merle Patricia; Arnold, Michael; Pearce, Christopher; Fry, Craig Lindsay.

In: Journal of Medical Ethics, Vol. 38, No. 9, 2012, p. 535 - 539.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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