Epistasis studies reveal redundancy among calcium-dependent protein kinases in motility and invasion of malaria parasites

Hanwei Fang, Ana Rita Gomes, Natacha Klages, Paco Pino, Bohumil Maco, Eloise M. Walker, Zenon A. Zenonos, Fiona Angrisano, Jake Baum, Christian Doerig, David A Baker, Oliver Billker, Mathieu Brochet

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In malaria parasites, evolution of parasitism has been linked to functional optimisation. Despite this optimisation, most members of a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) family show genetic redundancy during erythrocytic proliferation. To identify relationships between phospho-signalling pathways, we here screen 294 genetic interactions among protein kinases in Plasmodium berghei. This reveals a synthetic negative interaction between a hypomorphic allele of the protein kinase G (PKG) and CDPK4 to control erythrocyte invasion which is conserved in P. falciparum. CDPK4 becomes critical when PKG-dependent calcium signals are attenuated to phosphorylate proteins important for the stability of the inner membrane complex, which serves as an anchor for the acto-myosin motor required for motility and invasion. Finally, we show that multiple kinases functionally complement CDPK4 during erythrocytic proliferation and transmission to the mosquito. This study reveals how CDPKs are wired within a stage-transcending signalling network to control motility and host cell invasion in malaria parasites.

Original languageEnglish
Article number4248
Number of pages14
JournalNature Communications
Volume9
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 Oct 2018

Keywords

  • kinases
  • malaria
  • parasite biology

Cite this

Fang, Hanwei ; Gomes, Ana Rita ; Klages, Natacha ; Pino, Paco ; Maco, Bohumil ; Walker, Eloise M. ; Zenonos, Zenon A. ; Angrisano, Fiona ; Baum, Jake ; Doerig, Christian ; Baker, David A ; Billker, Oliver ; Brochet, Mathieu. / Epistasis studies reveal redundancy among calcium-dependent protein kinases in motility and invasion of malaria parasites. In: Nature Communications. 2018 ; Vol. 9, No. 1.
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abstract = "In malaria parasites, evolution of parasitism has been linked to functional optimisation. Despite this optimisation, most members of a calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPK) family show genetic redundancy during erythrocytic proliferation. To identify relationships between phospho-signalling pathways, we here screen 294 genetic interactions among protein kinases in Plasmodium berghei. This reveals a synthetic negative interaction between a hypomorphic allele of the protein kinase G (PKG) and CDPK4 to control erythrocyte invasion which is conserved in P. falciparum. CDPK4 becomes critical when PKG-dependent calcium signals are attenuated to phosphorylate proteins important for the stability of the inner membrane complex, which serves as an anchor for the acto-myosin motor required for motility and invasion. Finally, we show that multiple kinases functionally complement CDPK4 during erythrocytic proliferation and transmission to the mosquito. This study reveals how CDPKs are wired within a stage-transcending signalling network to control motility and host cell invasion in malaria parasites.",
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Fang, H, Gomes, AR, Klages, N, Pino, P, Maco, B, Walker, EM, Zenonos, ZA, Angrisano, F, Baum, J, Doerig, C, Baker, DA, Billker, O & Brochet, M 2018, 'Epistasis studies reveal redundancy among calcium-dependent protein kinases in motility and invasion of malaria parasites' Nature Communications, vol. 9, no. 1, 4248. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-018-06733-w

Epistasis studies reveal redundancy among calcium-dependent protein kinases in motility and invasion of malaria parasites. / Fang, Hanwei; Gomes, Ana Rita; Klages, Natacha; Pino, Paco; Maco, Bohumil; Walker, Eloise M.; Zenonos, Zenon A.; Angrisano, Fiona; Baum, Jake; Doerig, Christian; Baker, David A; Billker, Oliver; Brochet, Mathieu.

In: Nature Communications, Vol. 9, No. 1, 4248, 12.10.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Gomes, Ana Rita

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AU - Walker, Eloise M.

AU - Zenonos, Zenon A.

AU - Angrisano, Fiona

AU - Baum, Jake

AU - Doerig, Christian

AU - Baker, David A

AU - Billker, Oliver

AU - Brochet, Mathieu

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