Epilepsy in Asia: Disease burden, management barriers, and challenges

Eugen Trinka, Patrick Kwan, ByungIn Lee, Amitabh Dash

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article reviews the burden of epilepsy in Asia, the challenges faced by people with epilepsy, and the management of epilepsy. Comparison is made with other parts of the world. For this narrative review, data were collected using specified search criteria. Articles investigating the epidemiology of epilepsy, diagnosis, comorbidities and associated mortality, stigmatization, and treatment were included. Epilepsy is a global health care issue affecting up to 70 million people worldwide. Nearly 80% of people with epilepsy live in low- and middle-income countries with limited resources. People with epilepsy are prone to physical and psychological comorbidities, including anxiety and depression, which can negatively impact their quality of life. Furthermore, people with epilepsy are at higher risk of premature death than people without epilepsy. Discrimination or stigmatization of people with epilepsy is common in Asia and can affect their education, work, and marriage opportunities. Access to epilepsy treatment varies throughout Asia. Although highly advanced treatment is available in some countries, up to 90% of people with epilepsy are not adequately treated or are not treated with conventional antiepileptic therapy in resource-limited countries. People in remote areas often do not receive any epilepsy care. First-generation antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are available, but usually only in urban areas, and second-generation AEDs are not available in all countries. Newer AEDs tend to have more favorable safety profiles than first-generation AEDs and provide options to tailor therapy for individual patients, especially those with comorbidities. Active epilepsy surgery centers are present in some countries, although epilepsy surgery is often underutilized given the number of patients who could benefit. Further epidemiologic research is needed to provide accurate epilepsy data across the Asian region. Coordinated action is warranted to improve access to treatment and care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)7-21
Number of pages15
JournalEpilepsia
Volume60
Issue numberS1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • antiepileptic drugs
  • Asia
  • comorbidity
  • seizures
  • social stigma

Cite this

Trinka, Eugen ; Kwan, Patrick ; Lee, ByungIn ; Dash, Amitabh. / Epilepsy in Asia : Disease burden, management barriers, and challenges. In: Epilepsia. 2019 ; Vol. 60, No. S1. pp. 7-21.
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Epilepsy in Asia : Disease burden, management barriers, and challenges. / Trinka, Eugen; Kwan, Patrick; Lee, ByungIn; Dash, Amitabh.

In: Epilepsia, Vol. 60, No. S1, 01.03.2019, p. 7-21.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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