Enhancement of protein transduction-mediated nuclear delivery by interaction with dynein/microtubules

Gregory William Moseley, Denisse Lorena Leyton, Dominic J Glover, Richard P Filmer, David Andrew Jans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is a major consideration for the design of vehicles for the delivery of drug/DNA cargo to cell nuclei for cancer and gene therapies. Recent data indicate that efficient nuclear import can involve the microtubule (MT)/dynein network, such that nuclear delivery of exogenous cargo could be enhanced by attachment to peptide modules mediating association with dynein components, but this has not been investigated. Here, we report that the nuclear delivery of an exogenous cargo that enters the cell by protein transduction can be enhanced by attachment to a dynein-association sequence, with dependence on the MT network. This indicates that dynein/MT-association modules may provide useful modules for DNA/drug delivery approaches.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)222 - 225
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Biotechnology
Volume145
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Cite this

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title = "Enhancement of protein transduction-mediated nuclear delivery by interaction with dynein/microtubules",
abstract = "Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is a major consideration for the design of vehicles for the delivery of drug/DNA cargo to cell nuclei for cancer and gene therapies. Recent data indicate that efficient nuclear import can involve the microtubule (MT)/dynein network, such that nuclear delivery of exogenous cargo could be enhanced by attachment to peptide modules mediating association with dynein components, but this has not been investigated. Here, we report that the nuclear delivery of an exogenous cargo that enters the cell by protein transduction can be enhanced by attachment to a dynein-association sequence, with dependence on the MT network. This indicates that dynein/MT-association modules may provide useful modules for DNA/drug delivery approaches.",
author = "Moseley, {Gregory William} and Leyton, {Denisse Lorena} and Glover, {Dominic J} and Filmer, {Richard P} and Jans, {David Andrew}",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1016/j.jbiotec.2009.11.015",
language = "English",
volume = "145",
pages = "222 -- 225",
journal = "Journal of Biotechnology",
issn = "0168-1656",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Enhancement of protein transduction-mediated nuclear delivery by interaction with dynein/microtubules. / Moseley, Gregory William; Leyton, Denisse Lorena; Glover, Dominic J; Filmer, Richard P; Jans, David Andrew.

In: Journal of Biotechnology, Vol. 145, 2010, p. 222 - 225.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Enhancement of protein transduction-mediated nuclear delivery by interaction with dynein/microtubules

AU - Moseley, Gregory William

AU - Leyton, Denisse Lorena

AU - Glover, Dominic J

AU - Filmer, Richard P

AU - Jans, David Andrew

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is a major consideration for the design of vehicles for the delivery of drug/DNA cargo to cell nuclei for cancer and gene therapies. Recent data indicate that efficient nuclear import can involve the microtubule (MT)/dynein network, such that nuclear delivery of exogenous cargo could be enhanced by attachment to peptide modules mediating association with dynein components, but this has not been investigated. Here, we report that the nuclear delivery of an exogenous cargo that enters the cell by protein transduction can be enhanced by attachment to a dynein-association sequence, with dependence on the MT network. This indicates that dynein/MT-association modules may provide useful modules for DNA/drug delivery approaches.

AB - Nucleocytoplasmic trafficking is a major consideration for the design of vehicles for the delivery of drug/DNA cargo to cell nuclei for cancer and gene therapies. Recent data indicate that efficient nuclear import can involve the microtubule (MT)/dynein network, such that nuclear delivery of exogenous cargo could be enhanced by attachment to peptide modules mediating association with dynein components, but this has not been investigated. Here, we report that the nuclear delivery of an exogenous cargo that enters the cell by protein transduction can be enhanced by attachment to a dynein-association sequence, with dependence on the MT network. This indicates that dynein/MT-association modules may provide useful modules for DNA/drug delivery approaches.

UR - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19958802

U2 - 10.1016/j.jbiotec.2009.11.015

DO - 10.1016/j.jbiotec.2009.11.015

M3 - Article

VL - 145

SP - 222

EP - 225

JO - Journal of Biotechnology

JF - Journal of Biotechnology

SN - 0168-1656

ER -