Enhanced corticospinal response to observed pain in pain synesthetes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Here, we investigated whether acquired pain synesthetes, individuals who experience actual pain when observing injury to another, demonstrate less corticospinal inhibition than do controls during pain observation, as a potential mechanism for the experience of vicarious pain. We
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)406 - 418
Number of pages13
JournalCognitive Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Cite this

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title = "Enhanced corticospinal response to observed pain in pain synesthetes",
abstract = "Here, we investigated whether acquired pain synesthetes, individuals who experience actual pain when observing injury to another, demonstrate less corticospinal inhibition than do controls during pain observation, as a potential mechanism for the experience of vicarious pain. We",
author = "Bernadette Fitzgibbon and Enticott, {Peter Gregory} and John Bradshaw and Giummarra, {Melita Joy} and Michael Chou and Nellie Georgiou-Karistianis and Paul Fitzgerald",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.3758/s13415-011-0080-8",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
pages = "406 -- 418",
journal = "Cognitive Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience",
issn = "1530-7026",
publisher = "Springer-Verlag London Ltd.",
number = "2",

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T1 - Enhanced corticospinal response to observed pain in pain synesthetes

AU - Fitzgibbon, Bernadette

AU - Enticott, Peter Gregory

AU - Bradshaw, John

AU - Giummarra, Melita Joy

AU - Chou, Michael

AU - Georgiou-Karistianis, Nellie

AU - Fitzgerald, Paul

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - Here, we investigated whether acquired pain synesthetes, individuals who experience actual pain when observing injury to another, demonstrate less corticospinal inhibition than do controls during pain observation, as a potential mechanism for the experience of vicarious pain. We

AB - Here, we investigated whether acquired pain synesthetes, individuals who experience actual pain when observing injury to another, demonstrate less corticospinal inhibition than do controls during pain observation, as a potential mechanism for the experience of vicarious pain. We

UR - http://www.springerlink.com/content/n77tmt0100512473/fulltext.pdf

U2 - 10.3758/s13415-011-0080-8

DO - 10.3758/s13415-011-0080-8

M3 - Article

VL - 12

SP - 406

EP - 418

JO - Cognitive Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience

JF - Cognitive Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience

SN - 1530-7026

IS - 2

ER -