Emergence of silicic continents as the lower crust peels off on a hot plate-tectonic Earth

Priyadarshi Chowdhury, Taras Gerya, Sumit Chakraborty

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42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The rock record and geochemical evidence indicate that continental recycling has been occurring since the early history of the Earth. The stabilization of felsic continents in place of Earth's early mafic crust about 3.0 to 2.0 billion years ago, perhaps due to the initiation of plate tectonics, implies widespread destruction of mafic crust during this time interval. However, the physical mechanisms of such intense recycling on a hotter, (late) Archaean and presumably plate-tectonic Earth remain largely unknown. Here we use thermomechanical modelling to show that extensive recycling via lower crustal peeling-off (delamination but not eclogitic dripping) during continent-continent convergence was near ubiquitous during the late Archaean to early Proterozoic. We propose that such destruction of the early mafic crust, together with felsic magmatism, may have caused both the emergence of silicic continents and their subsequent isostatic rise, possibly above the sea level. Such changes in the continental character have been proposed to influence the Great Oxidation Event and, therefore, peeling-off plate tectonics could be the geodynamic trigger for this event. A transition to the slab break-off controlled syn-orogenic recycling occurred as the Earth aged and cooled, leading to reduced recycling and enhanced preservation of the continental crust of present-day composition.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)698-703
Number of pages6
JournalNature Geoscience
Volume10
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Hadean
  • plate tectonics
  • zircon

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