El Nino/Southern Oscillation climatic variability in Australasian and South American paleoenvironmental records

M. S. McGlone, A. P. Kershaw, V. Markgraf

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Otherpeer-review

    151 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The dominant effect of El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on amphi-South Pacific climates is to increase the variability of precipitation. The characteristic climate pattterns which accompany the alternating phases of ENSO are opposed in the eastern and western Pacific. Broadly speaking, in Australasia droughts accompany El Nino events, and wetter than average conditions accompany La Nina events, whereas in western South America south of the equator, wet conditions characterize El Nino and drier conditions characterize La Nina events. New Zealand and southern South American climates are somewhat cooler during El Nino events. The generally more stable climates of the early Holocene period and lack of comparable precipitation patterns in the amphi-South Pacific land areas point to either a much reduced amplitude of the ENSO fluctuations, or to a change in the extratropical expression of ENSO due to different climatic boundary conditions. -from Authors

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationEl Nino
    Subtitle of host publicationhistorical and paleoclimatic aspects of the Southern Oscillation
    EditorsHENRY F DIAZ, VERA MARKGRAF
    Place of PublicationNew York NY USA
    PublisherCambridge University Press
    Pages435-462
    Number of pages28
    ISBN (Print)9780521430425, 9780521111614
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1993

    Cite this

    McGlone, M. S., Kershaw, A. P., & Markgraf, V. (1993). El Nino/Southern Oscillation climatic variability in Australasian and South American paleoenvironmental records. In HENRY. F. DIAZ, & VERA. MARKGRAF (Eds.), El Nino: historical and paleoclimatic aspects of the Southern Oscillation (pp. 435-462). New York NY USA: Cambridge University Press.
    McGlone, M. S. ; Kershaw, A. P. ; Markgraf, V. / El Nino/Southern Oscillation climatic variability in Australasian and South American paleoenvironmental records. El Nino: historical and paleoclimatic aspects of the Southern Oscillation. editor / HENRY F DIAZ ; VERA MARKGRAF. New York NY USA : Cambridge University Press, 1993. pp. 435-462
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    McGlone, MS, Kershaw, AP & Markgraf, V 1993, El Nino/Southern Oscillation climatic variability in Australasian and South American paleoenvironmental records. in HENRYF DIAZ & VERA MARKGRAF (eds), El Nino: historical and paleoclimatic aspects of the Southern Oscillation. Cambridge University Press, New York NY USA, pp. 435-462.

    El Nino/Southern Oscillation climatic variability in Australasian and South American paleoenvironmental records. / McGlone, M. S.; Kershaw, A. P.; Markgraf, V.

    El Nino: historical and paleoclimatic aspects of the Southern Oscillation. ed. / HENRY F DIAZ; VERA MARKGRAF. New York NY USA : Cambridge University Press, 1993. p. 435-462.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Otherpeer-review

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    AB - The dominant effect of El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on amphi-South Pacific climates is to increase the variability of precipitation. The characteristic climate pattterns which accompany the alternating phases of ENSO are opposed in the eastern and western Pacific. Broadly speaking, in Australasia droughts accompany El Nino events, and wetter than average conditions accompany La Nina events, whereas in western South America south of the equator, wet conditions characterize El Nino and drier conditions characterize La Nina events. New Zealand and southern South American climates are somewhat cooler during El Nino events. The generally more stable climates of the early Holocene period and lack of comparable precipitation patterns in the amphi-South Pacific land areas point to either a much reduced amplitude of the ENSO fluctuations, or to a change in the extratropical expression of ENSO due to different climatic boundary conditions. -from Authors

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    McGlone MS, Kershaw AP, Markgraf V. El Nino/Southern Oscillation climatic variability in Australasian and South American paleoenvironmental records. In DIAZ HENRYF, MARKGRAF VERA, editors, El Nino: historical and paleoclimatic aspects of the Southern Oscillation. New York NY USA: Cambridge University Press. 1993. p. 435-462