Effects of high temperature oxidation on creep life prediction of Cr-Mo components

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Abstract

Accelerated rupture testing is employed to aid in assessing the remaining life for components such as pipes and tubes used in high temperature plants. Due to the high temperature nature of the test, oxide growth plays a role in affecting the test by enhancing the stress. This paper includes the study of oxide-scale growth and metal loss kinetics during air oxidation of three Cr-Mo steels used in the manufacturing of boiler tubing. These tests were carried out using cylindrical specimens similar to creep test pieces at 700°C for times up to 600 h. 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 2.25Cr-1Mo steels showed a similar oxidation behavior, however, the 9Cr-1Mo was much higher in oxidation resistance in air. Post oxidation analysis for some representative specimens were carried out using SEM/EDXS and X-ray mapping. Multilayer oxide formation was observed to occur in 1.25Cr-0.5Mo and 2.25Cr-1Mo steels, involving oxides with various compositions. This paper also explains the ongoing investigations at Monash University regarding the high temperature oxidation of CrMo steel and the role of oxidation in affecting the accelerated creep tests.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings - ECCC Creep Conference
Subtitle of host publicationCreep and Fracture in High Temperature Components - Design and Life Assessment Issues
Pages959-968
Number of pages10
Volume2005
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2005
EventECCC Creep Conference: Creep and Fracture in High Temperature Components - Design and Life Assessment Issues - London, United Kingdom
Duration: 12 Sep 200514 Sep 2005

Conference

ConferenceECCC Creep Conference: Creep and Fracture in High Temperature Components - Design and Life Assessment Issues
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityLondon
Period12/09/0514/09/05

Keywords

  • Accelerated rupture tests
  • Cr-Mo steels
  • Stress enhancement factor

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