Effects of death anxiety on perceived stress in individuals with multiple sclerosis and the role of self-transcendence

Abbas Abdollahi, Hannaneh Panahipour, Kelly A. Allen, Simin Hosseinian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Stress is a commonly reported concern of individuals with chronical diseases, including multiple sclerosis (MS). This study sought to investigate the relationships between self-transcendence, death anxiety, and perceived stress among individuals with MS from Iran. A second aim of the study was to assess the buffering effect of self-transcendence in the relationship between death anxiety and perceived stress. Two hundred and fifteen participants with MS from four hospitals completed measures assessing self-transcendence, death anxiety, and perceived stress. Using structural equation modeling, death anxiety was found to be positively related to perceived stress. In addition, there was a negative relationship between self-transcendence and perceived stress. Results of the study suggest that self-transcendence is a buffer in the link between death anxiety and perceived stress for individuals with MS. The findings demonstrate the importance of self-transcendence in decreasing the effects of death anxiety on perceived stress and have clinical implications for health professionals.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages12
JournalOmega: Journal of Death and Dying
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2019

Keywords

  • death anxiety
  • perceived stress
  • self-transcendence
  • individuals with multiple sclerosis

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