Effectiveness of suicide prevention programs for emergency and protective services employees: A systematic review and meta-analysis

Katrina Witt, Allison Milner, Amanda Allisey, Lauren Davenport, Anthony Lamontagne

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: This brief report summarizes the international literature on the effectiveness of suicide prevention programs for protective and emergency services employees. Methods: A systematic search of 11 electronic databases was undertaken until June 30, 2015. Quantitative meta-analysis was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of these programs on suicide rates at post-intervention. Qualitative analyses were also used to identify program components that may be associated with reductions in suicide rates. Results: A total of 13 studies were included. Only six reported sufficient information on suicide rates to enable inclusion in quantitative analyses, however. On average, these programs were associated with an approximate halving in suicide rates over an average follow-up period of 5.25 years (SD=4.2; range: 1-11) (Incidence Rate Ratio 0.45, 95%CI 0.31-0.65; five studies; I2 14.8%). Few programs integrated activities at the primary prevention level. Conclusion: A greater focus on the relatively neglected area of workplace primary prevention could further improve suicide prevention effectiveness.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)394-407
Number of pages14
JournalAmerican Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume60
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Emergency services
  • First responders
  • Police
  • Suicide prevention

Cite this

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title = "Effectiveness of suicide prevention programs for emergency and protective services employees: A systematic review and meta-analysis",
abstract = "Background: This brief report summarizes the international literature on the effectiveness of suicide prevention programs for protective and emergency services employees. Methods: A systematic search of 11 electronic databases was undertaken until June 30, 2015. Quantitative meta-analysis was undertaken to investigate the effectiveness of these programs on suicide rates at post-intervention. Qualitative analyses were also used to identify program components that may be associated with reductions in suicide rates. Results: A total of 13 studies were included. Only six reported sufficient information on suicide rates to enable inclusion in quantitative analyses, however. On average, these programs were associated with an approximate halving in suicide rates over an average follow-up period of 5.25 years (SD=4.2; range: 1-11) (Incidence Rate Ratio 0.45, 95{\%}CI 0.31-0.65; five studies; I2 14.8{\%}). Few programs integrated activities at the primary prevention level. Conclusion: A greater focus on the relatively neglected area of workplace primary prevention could further improve suicide prevention effectiveness.",
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Effectiveness of suicide prevention programs for emergency and protective services employees : A systematic review and meta-analysis. / Witt, Katrina; Milner, Allison; Allisey, Amanda; Davenport, Lauren; Lamontagne, Anthony.

In: American Journal of Industrial Medicine, Vol. 60, No. 4, 04.2017, p. 394-407.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Allisey, Amanda

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AU - Lamontagne, Anthony

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