Effect of whole foods and dietary patterns on markers of subclinical inflammation in weight-stable overweight and obese adults: a systematic review

Stephanie F. Cowan, Emily R. Leeming, Aimee Dordevic, Andrew James Sinclair, Helen Truby, Simone Gibson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

CONTEXT: Reduction of subclinical inflammation is a potential target for chronic disease management. Adiposity is a known modifier of meta-inflammation; however, the influence of dietary factors is less clear. OBJECTIVE: This review examines evidence from human trials evaluating effects of whole foods or dietary patterns on circulating inflammatory markers in weight-stable overweight and obese adults. It is the first review to investigate effects of diet on inflammation, independent of changes in adiposity. DATA SOURCES: The Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were searched. DATA EXTRACTION: Data extraction was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. DATA ANALYSIS: Study quality was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Assessment tool. Thirty-three studies were included assessing effects of 17 foods and dietary patterns on 39 inflammatory markers. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, foods and dietary patterns were not found to have significant effects on inflammatory markers in weight-stable individuals. Inconsistencies among studies were largely due to methodological limitations. Future research should invest in longer intervention periods and standardization of inflammatory marker panels paired with novel technologies, while ensuring anthropometric measures are monitored and adequately controls are used. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: Prospero registration number CRD42017067765.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)19-38
Number of pages20
JournalNutrition Reviews
Volume78
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • dairy
  • diet
  • fruits and vegetables
  • inflammation
  • obesity
  • soy

Cite this

@article{f5248f2abef3485d9d805cc77b725470,
title = "Effect of whole foods and dietary patterns on markers of subclinical inflammation in weight-stable overweight and obese adults: a systematic review",
abstract = "CONTEXT: Reduction of subclinical inflammation is a potential target for chronic disease management. Adiposity is a known modifier of meta-inflammation; however, the influence of dietary factors is less clear. OBJECTIVE: This review examines evidence from human trials evaluating effects of whole foods or dietary patterns on circulating inflammatory markers in weight-stable overweight and obese adults. It is the first review to investigate effects of diet on inflammation, independent of changes in adiposity. DATA SOURCES: The Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were searched. DATA EXTRACTION: Data extraction was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. DATA ANALYSIS: Study quality was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Assessment tool. Thirty-three studies were included assessing effects of 17 foods and dietary patterns on 39 inflammatory markers. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, foods and dietary patterns were not found to have significant effects on inflammatory markers in weight-stable individuals. Inconsistencies among studies were largely due to methodological limitations. Future research should invest in longer intervention periods and standardization of inflammatory marker panels paired with novel technologies, while ensuring anthropometric measures are monitored and adequately controls are used. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: Prospero registration number CRD42017067765.",
keywords = "dairy, diet, fruits and vegetables, inflammation, obesity, soy",
author = "Cowan, {Stephanie F.} and Leeming, {Emily R.} and Aimee Dordevic and Sinclair, {Andrew James} and Helen Truby and Simone Gibson",
year = "2020",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1093/nutrit/nuz030",
language = "English",
volume = "78",
pages = "19--38",
journal = "Nutrition Reviews",
issn = "0029-6643",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "1",

}

Effect of whole foods and dietary patterns on markers of subclinical inflammation in weight-stable overweight and obese adults : a systematic review. / Cowan, Stephanie F.; Leeming, Emily R.; Dordevic, Aimee; Sinclair, Andrew James; Truby, Helen; Gibson, Simone.

In: Nutrition Reviews, Vol. 78, No. 1, 01.01.2020, p. 19-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of whole foods and dietary patterns on markers of subclinical inflammation in weight-stable overweight and obese adults

T2 - a systematic review

AU - Cowan, Stephanie F.

AU - Leeming, Emily R.

AU - Dordevic, Aimee

AU - Sinclair, Andrew James

AU - Truby, Helen

AU - Gibson, Simone

PY - 2020/1/1

Y1 - 2020/1/1

N2 - CONTEXT: Reduction of subclinical inflammation is a potential target for chronic disease management. Adiposity is a known modifier of meta-inflammation; however, the influence of dietary factors is less clear. OBJECTIVE: This review examines evidence from human trials evaluating effects of whole foods or dietary patterns on circulating inflammatory markers in weight-stable overweight and obese adults. It is the first review to investigate effects of diet on inflammation, independent of changes in adiposity. DATA SOURCES: The Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were searched. DATA EXTRACTION: Data extraction was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. DATA ANALYSIS: Study quality was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Assessment tool. Thirty-three studies were included assessing effects of 17 foods and dietary patterns on 39 inflammatory markers. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, foods and dietary patterns were not found to have significant effects on inflammatory markers in weight-stable individuals. Inconsistencies among studies were largely due to methodological limitations. Future research should invest in longer intervention periods and standardization of inflammatory marker panels paired with novel technologies, while ensuring anthropometric measures are monitored and adequately controls are used. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: Prospero registration number CRD42017067765.

AB - CONTEXT: Reduction of subclinical inflammation is a potential target for chronic disease management. Adiposity is a known modifier of meta-inflammation; however, the influence of dietary factors is less clear. OBJECTIVE: This review examines evidence from human trials evaluating effects of whole foods or dietary patterns on circulating inflammatory markers in weight-stable overweight and obese adults. It is the first review to investigate effects of diet on inflammation, independent of changes in adiposity. DATA SOURCES: The Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and Cochrane databases were searched. DATA EXTRACTION: Data extraction was conducted using the Cochrane Collaboration Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. DATA ANALYSIS: Study quality was evaluated using the Cochrane Collaboration Risk of Bias Assessment tool. Thirty-three studies were included assessing effects of 17 foods and dietary patterns on 39 inflammatory markers. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, foods and dietary patterns were not found to have significant effects on inflammatory markers in weight-stable individuals. Inconsistencies among studies were largely due to methodological limitations. Future research should invest in longer intervention periods and standardization of inflammatory marker panels paired with novel technologies, while ensuring anthropometric measures are monitored and adequately controls are used. SYSTEMATIC REVIEW REGISTRATION: Prospero registration number CRD42017067765.

KW - dairy

KW - diet

KW - fruits and vegetables

KW - inflammation

KW - obesity

KW - soy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85076871901&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/nutrit/nuz030

DO - 10.1093/nutrit/nuz030

M3 - Article

C2 - 31429908

AN - SCOPUS:85076871901

VL - 78

SP - 19

EP - 38

JO - Nutrition Reviews

JF - Nutrition Reviews

SN - 0029-6643

IS - 1

ER -