Effect of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment on clinical outcomes in intensive care unit patients with infection and sepsis patients

A patient-level meta-analysis of randomized trials

Yannick Wirz, Marc A. Meier, Lila Bouadma, Charles E. Luyt, Michel Wolff, Jean Chastre, Florence Tubach, Stefan Schroeder, Vandack Nobre, Djillali Annane, Konrad Reinhart, Pierre Damas, Maarten Nijsten, Arezoo Shajiei, Dylan W. deLange, Rodrigo O. Deliberato, Carolina F. Oliveira, Yahya Shehabi, Jos A.H. van Oers, Albertus Beishuizen & 4 others Armand R.J. Girbes, Evelien de Jong, Beat Mueller, Philipp Schuetz

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The clinical utility of serum procalcitonin levels in guiding antibiotic treatment decisions in patients with sepsis remains unclear. This patient-level meta-analysis based on 11 randomized trials investigates the impact of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic therapy on mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with infection, both overall and stratified according to sepsis definition, severity, and type of infection. Methods: For this meta-analysis focusing on procalcitonin-guided antibiotic management in critically ill patients with sepsis of any type, in February 2018 we updated the database of a previous individual patient data meta-analysis which was limited to patients with respiratory infections only. We used individual patient data from 11 trials that randomly assigned patients to receive antibiotics based on procalcitonin levels (the "procalcitonin-guided" group) or the current standard of care (the "controls"). The primary endpoint was mortality within 30 days. Secondary endpoints were duration of antibiotic treatment and length of stay. Results: Mortality in the 2252 procalcitonin-guided patients was significantly lower compared with the 2230 control group patients (21.1% vs 23.7%; adjusted odds ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8 to 0.99; p = 0.03). These effects on mortality persisted in a subgroup of patients meeting the sepsis 3 definition and based on the severity of sepsis (assessed on the basis of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, occurrence of septic shock or renal failure, and need for vasopressor or ventilatory support) and on the type of infection (respiratory, urinary tract, abdominal, skin, or central nervous system), with interaction for each analysis being > 0.05. Procalcitonin guidance also facilitated earlier discontinuation of antibiotics, with a reduction in treatment duration (9.3 vs 10.4 days; adjusted coefficient -1.19 days, 95% CI -1.73 to -0.66; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment in ICU patients with infection and sepsis patients results in improved survival and lower antibiotic treatment duration.

Original languageEnglish
Article number191
Number of pages11
JournalCritical Care
Volume22
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Aug 2018

Keywords

  • Antibiotic stewardship
  • Meta-analysis
  • Procalcitonin
  • Sepsis

Cite this

Wirz, Yannick ; Meier, Marc A. ; Bouadma, Lila ; Luyt, Charles E. ; Wolff, Michel ; Chastre, Jean ; Tubach, Florence ; Schroeder, Stefan ; Nobre, Vandack ; Annane, Djillali ; Reinhart, Konrad ; Damas, Pierre ; Nijsten, Maarten ; Shajiei, Arezoo ; deLange, Dylan W. ; Deliberato, Rodrigo O. ; Oliveira, Carolina F. ; Shehabi, Yahya ; van Oers, Jos A.H. ; Beishuizen, Albertus ; Girbes, Armand R.J. ; de Jong, Evelien ; Mueller, Beat ; Schuetz, Philipp. / Effect of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment on clinical outcomes in intensive care unit patients with infection and sepsis patients : A patient-level meta-analysis of randomized trials. In: Critical Care. 2018 ; Vol. 22, No. 1.
@article{536523d3a7364210ab4ab2b756d6ac64,
title = "Effect of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment on clinical outcomes in intensive care unit patients with infection and sepsis patients: A patient-level meta-analysis of randomized trials",
abstract = "Background: The clinical utility of serum procalcitonin levels in guiding antibiotic treatment decisions in patients with sepsis remains unclear. This patient-level meta-analysis based on 11 randomized trials investigates the impact of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic therapy on mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with infection, both overall and stratified according to sepsis definition, severity, and type of infection. Methods: For this meta-analysis focusing on procalcitonin-guided antibiotic management in critically ill patients with sepsis of any type, in February 2018 we updated the database of a previous individual patient data meta-analysis which was limited to patients with respiratory infections only. We used individual patient data from 11 trials that randomly assigned patients to receive antibiotics based on procalcitonin levels (the {"}procalcitonin-guided{"} group) or the current standard of care (the {"}controls{"}). The primary endpoint was mortality within 30 days. Secondary endpoints were duration of antibiotic treatment and length of stay. Results: Mortality in the 2252 procalcitonin-guided patients was significantly lower compared with the 2230 control group patients (21.1{\%} vs 23.7{\%}; adjusted odds ratio 0.89, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 0.8 to 0.99; p = 0.03). These effects on mortality persisted in a subgroup of patients meeting the sepsis 3 definition and based on the severity of sepsis (assessed on the basis of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, occurrence of septic shock or renal failure, and need for vasopressor or ventilatory support) and on the type of infection (respiratory, urinary tract, abdominal, skin, or central nervous system), with interaction for each analysis being > 0.05. Procalcitonin guidance also facilitated earlier discontinuation of antibiotics, with a reduction in treatment duration (9.3 vs 10.4 days; adjusted coefficient -1.19 days, 95{\%} CI -1.73 to -0.66; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment in ICU patients with infection and sepsis patients results in improved survival and lower antibiotic treatment duration.",
keywords = "Antibiotic stewardship, Meta-analysis, Procalcitonin, Sepsis",
author = "Yannick Wirz and Meier, {Marc A.} and Lila Bouadma and Luyt, {Charles E.} and Michel Wolff and Jean Chastre and Florence Tubach and Stefan Schroeder and Vandack Nobre and Djillali Annane and Konrad Reinhart and Pierre Damas and Maarten Nijsten and Arezoo Shajiei and deLange, {Dylan W.} and Deliberato, {Rodrigo O.} and Oliveira, {Carolina F.} and Yahya Shehabi and {van Oers}, {Jos A.H.} and Albertus Beishuizen and Girbes, {Armand R.J.} and {de Jong}, Evelien and Beat Mueller and Philipp Schuetz",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1186/s13054-018-2125-7",
language = "English",
volume = "22",
journal = "Critical Care",
issn = "1364-8535",
number = "1",

}

Wirz, Y, Meier, MA, Bouadma, L, Luyt, CE, Wolff, M, Chastre, J, Tubach, F, Schroeder, S, Nobre, V, Annane, D, Reinhart, K, Damas, P, Nijsten, M, Shajiei, A, deLange, DW, Deliberato, RO, Oliveira, CF, Shehabi, Y, van Oers, JAH, Beishuizen, A, Girbes, ARJ, de Jong, E, Mueller, B & Schuetz, P 2018, 'Effect of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment on clinical outcomes in intensive care unit patients with infection and sepsis patients: A patient-level meta-analysis of randomized trials', Critical Care, vol. 22, no. 1, 191. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13054-018-2125-7

Effect of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment on clinical outcomes in intensive care unit patients with infection and sepsis patients : A patient-level meta-analysis of randomized trials. / Wirz, Yannick; Meier, Marc A.; Bouadma, Lila; Luyt, Charles E.; Wolff, Michel; Chastre, Jean; Tubach, Florence; Schroeder, Stefan; Nobre, Vandack; Annane, Djillali; Reinhart, Konrad; Damas, Pierre; Nijsten, Maarten; Shajiei, Arezoo; deLange, Dylan W.; Deliberato, Rodrigo O.; Oliveira, Carolina F.; Shehabi, Yahya; van Oers, Jos A.H.; Beishuizen, Albertus; Girbes, Armand R.J.; de Jong, Evelien; Mueller, Beat; Schuetz, Philipp.

In: Critical Care, Vol. 22, No. 1, 191, 15.08.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment on clinical outcomes in intensive care unit patients with infection and sepsis patients

T2 - A patient-level meta-analysis of randomized trials

AU - Wirz, Yannick

AU - Meier, Marc A.

AU - Bouadma, Lila

AU - Luyt, Charles E.

AU - Wolff, Michel

AU - Chastre, Jean

AU - Tubach, Florence

AU - Schroeder, Stefan

AU - Nobre, Vandack

AU - Annane, Djillali

AU - Reinhart, Konrad

AU - Damas, Pierre

AU - Nijsten, Maarten

AU - Shajiei, Arezoo

AU - deLange, Dylan W.

AU - Deliberato, Rodrigo O.

AU - Oliveira, Carolina F.

AU - Shehabi, Yahya

AU - van Oers, Jos A.H.

AU - Beishuizen, Albertus

AU - Girbes, Armand R.J.

AU - de Jong, Evelien

AU - Mueller, Beat

AU - Schuetz, Philipp

PY - 2018/8/15

Y1 - 2018/8/15

N2 - Background: The clinical utility of serum procalcitonin levels in guiding antibiotic treatment decisions in patients with sepsis remains unclear. This patient-level meta-analysis based on 11 randomized trials investigates the impact of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic therapy on mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with infection, both overall and stratified according to sepsis definition, severity, and type of infection. Methods: For this meta-analysis focusing on procalcitonin-guided antibiotic management in critically ill patients with sepsis of any type, in February 2018 we updated the database of a previous individual patient data meta-analysis which was limited to patients with respiratory infections only. We used individual patient data from 11 trials that randomly assigned patients to receive antibiotics based on procalcitonin levels (the "procalcitonin-guided" group) or the current standard of care (the "controls"). The primary endpoint was mortality within 30 days. Secondary endpoints were duration of antibiotic treatment and length of stay. Results: Mortality in the 2252 procalcitonin-guided patients was significantly lower compared with the 2230 control group patients (21.1% vs 23.7%; adjusted odds ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8 to 0.99; p = 0.03). These effects on mortality persisted in a subgroup of patients meeting the sepsis 3 definition and based on the severity of sepsis (assessed on the basis of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, occurrence of septic shock or renal failure, and need for vasopressor or ventilatory support) and on the type of infection (respiratory, urinary tract, abdominal, skin, or central nervous system), with interaction for each analysis being > 0.05. Procalcitonin guidance also facilitated earlier discontinuation of antibiotics, with a reduction in treatment duration (9.3 vs 10.4 days; adjusted coefficient -1.19 days, 95% CI -1.73 to -0.66; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment in ICU patients with infection and sepsis patients results in improved survival and lower antibiotic treatment duration.

AB - Background: The clinical utility of serum procalcitonin levels in guiding antibiotic treatment decisions in patients with sepsis remains unclear. This patient-level meta-analysis based on 11 randomized trials investigates the impact of procalcitonin-guided antibiotic therapy on mortality in intensive care unit (ICU) patients with infection, both overall and stratified according to sepsis definition, severity, and type of infection. Methods: For this meta-analysis focusing on procalcitonin-guided antibiotic management in critically ill patients with sepsis of any type, in February 2018 we updated the database of a previous individual patient data meta-analysis which was limited to patients with respiratory infections only. We used individual patient data from 11 trials that randomly assigned patients to receive antibiotics based on procalcitonin levels (the "procalcitonin-guided" group) or the current standard of care (the "controls"). The primary endpoint was mortality within 30 days. Secondary endpoints were duration of antibiotic treatment and length of stay. Results: Mortality in the 2252 procalcitonin-guided patients was significantly lower compared with the 2230 control group patients (21.1% vs 23.7%; adjusted odds ratio 0.89, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8 to 0.99; p = 0.03). These effects on mortality persisted in a subgroup of patients meeting the sepsis 3 definition and based on the severity of sepsis (assessed on the basis of the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, occurrence of septic shock or renal failure, and need for vasopressor or ventilatory support) and on the type of infection (respiratory, urinary tract, abdominal, skin, or central nervous system), with interaction for each analysis being > 0.05. Procalcitonin guidance also facilitated earlier discontinuation of antibiotics, with a reduction in treatment duration (9.3 vs 10.4 days; adjusted coefficient -1.19 days, 95% CI -1.73 to -0.66; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Procalcitonin-guided antibiotic treatment in ICU patients with infection and sepsis patients results in improved survival and lower antibiotic treatment duration.

KW - Antibiotic stewardship

KW - Meta-analysis

KW - Procalcitonin

KW - Sepsis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85051726925&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1186/s13054-018-2125-7

DO - 10.1186/s13054-018-2125-7

M3 - Review Article

VL - 22

JO - Critical Care

JF - Critical Care

SN - 1364-8535

IS - 1

M1 - 191

ER -