Effect of Night Time Eating on Postprandial Triglyceride Metabolism in Healthy Adults: A Systematic Literature Review

Maxine P. Bonham, Elleni Kaias, Iona Zimberg, Gloria K. W. Leung, Rochelle Davis, Tracey L. Sletten, Hazel Windsor-Aubrey, Catherine E. Huggins

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Eating at night time, as is frequent in shift workers, may contribute to increased cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk through a disruption in usual lipid metabolism, resulting in repeated and sustained hyperlipidemia at night. This systematic review aimed to investigate the impact of eating a meal at night compared with the same meal eaten during the day on postprandial lipemia. Six databases were searched: CINAHL Plus, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, Ovid MEDLINE, Informit, and SCOPUS. Eligible studies were original research cross-over design with a minimum fasting period of 5 h before testing preceded by a standardized control meal; measured postprandial triacylglycerol (TAG) for 5 h or greater; had meal time between 0700 h and 1600 h for day time and between 2000 h and 0400 h for night time; and had within-study test meals (food or drink) that were identical in macronutrient composition and energy. Two authors independently completed eligibility and quality assessment using the American Dietetic Association Quality Criteria Checklist for Primary Research. After removing duplicates, 4,423 articles were screened, yielding 5 studies for qualitative synthesis. All studies identified at least one parameter of the postprandial TAG response that was different as a result of meal time (e.g., the total concentration or the time course kinetics). Two studies reported a greater total TAG concentration (area under curve) at night compared with day, and 3 studies found no difference. Four studies reported that the kinetics of the postprandial time course of TAGs was different at night compared with during the day. Inconsistent reporting in the primary studies was a limitation of the review. Night eating may negatively affect postprandial lipemia and this review shows there is a need to rigorously test this using standardized methods and analysis with larger sample sizes. This is critical for informing strategies to lower CVD risk for shift workers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)119-130
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Biological Rhythms
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019

Keywords

  • diurnal
  • lipemia
  • metabolism
  • night time
  • postprandial
  • shift work
  • triacylglycerol

Cite this

Bonham, Maxine P. ; Kaias, Elleni ; Zimberg, Iona ; Leung, Gloria K. W. ; Davis, Rochelle ; Sletten, Tracey L. ; Windsor-Aubrey, Hazel ; Huggins, Catherine E. / Effect of Night Time Eating on Postprandial Triglyceride Metabolism in Healthy Adults : A Systematic Literature Review. In: Journal of Biological Rhythms. 2019 ; Vol. 34, No. 2. pp. 119-130.
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Effect of Night Time Eating on Postprandial Triglyceride Metabolism in Healthy Adults : A Systematic Literature Review. / Bonham, Maxine P.; Kaias, Elleni; Zimberg, Iona; Leung, Gloria K. W.; Davis, Rochelle; Sletten, Tracey L.; Windsor-Aubrey, Hazel; Huggins, Catherine E.

In: Journal of Biological Rhythms, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.04.2019, p. 119-130.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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