Early priming minimizes the age-related immune compromise of CD8+ T cell diversity and function

Sophie Alessandra Valkenburg, Vanessa Venturi, Thurston H Y Dang, Nicola L Bird, Peter C Doherty, Stephen J. Turner, Miles Philip Davenport, Katherine Kedzierska

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The elderly are particularly susceptible to influenza A virus infections, with increased occurrence, disease severity and reduced vaccine efficacy attributed to declining immunity. Experimentally, the age-dependent decline in influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responsiveness reflects both functional compromise and the emergence of 'repertoire holes' arising from the loss of low frequency clonotypes. In this study, we asked whether early priming limits the time-related attrition of immune competence. Though primary responses in aged mice were compromised, animals vaccinated at 6 weeks then challenged >20 months later had T-cell responses that were normal in magnitude. Both functional quality and the persistence of 'preferred' TCR clonotypes that expand in a characteristic immunodominance hierarchy were maintained following early priming. Similar to the early priming, vaccination at 22 months followed by challenge retained a response magnitude equivalent to young mice. However, late priming resulted in reduced TCRβ diversity in comparison with vaccination earlier in life. Thus, early priming was critical to maintaining individual and population-wide TCRβ diversity. In summary, early exposure leads to the long-term maintenance of memory T cells and thus preserves optimal, influenza-specific CD8+ T-cell responsiveness and protects against the age-related attrition of naïve T-cell precursors. Our study supports development of vaccines that prime CD8+ T-cells early in life to elicit the broadest possible spectrum of CD8+ T-cell memory and preserve the magnitude, functionality and TCR usage of responding populations. In addition, our study provides the most comprehensive analysis of the aged (primary, secondary primed-early and secondary primed-late) TCR repertoires published to date.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere1002544
JournalPLoS Pathogens
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2012
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Valkenburg, S. A., Venturi, V., Dang, T. H. Y., Bird, N. L., Doherty, P. C., Turner, S. J., ... Kedzierska, K. (2012). Early priming minimizes the age-related immune compromise of CD8+ T cell diversity and function. PLoS Pathogens, 8(2), [e1002544]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1002544
Valkenburg, Sophie Alessandra ; Venturi, Vanessa ; Dang, Thurston H Y ; Bird, Nicola L ; Doherty, Peter C ; Turner, Stephen J. ; Davenport, Miles Philip ; Kedzierska, Katherine. / Early priming minimizes the age-related immune compromise of CD8+ T cell diversity and function. In: PLoS Pathogens. 2012 ; Vol. 8, No. 2.
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Valkenburg, SA, Venturi, V, Dang, THY, Bird, NL, Doherty, PC, Turner, SJ, Davenport, MP & Kedzierska, K 2012, 'Early priming minimizes the age-related immune compromise of CD8+ T cell diversity and function' PLoS Pathogens, vol. 8, no. 2, e1002544. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.ppat.1002544

Early priming minimizes the age-related immune compromise of CD8+ T cell diversity and function. / Valkenburg, Sophie Alessandra; Venturi, Vanessa; Dang, Thurston H Y; Bird, Nicola L; Doherty, Peter C; Turner, Stephen J.; Davenport, Miles Philip; Kedzierska, Katherine.

In: PLoS Pathogens, Vol. 8, No. 2, e1002544, 02.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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