Early Mobilization in the Intensive Care Unit to Improve Long-Term Recovery

Michelle Paton, Rebecca Lane, Carol L. Hodgson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article outlines the effect of early mobilization on the long-term recovery of patients following critical illness. It investigates the safety of performing exercise in this environment, the differing types of rehabilitation that can be provided, and the gaps remaining in evidence around this area. It also attempts to assist clinicians in prescription of exercise in this cohort while informing all readers about the impact that mobilization can have for the outcomes of intensive care patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)557-571
Number of pages15
JournalCritical Care Clinics
Volume34
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

Keywords

  • Dosage
  • ICU
  • Intensive care
  • Mobilization
  • Recovery
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

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Early Mobilization in the Intensive Care Unit to Improve Long-Term Recovery. / Paton, Michelle; Lane, Rebecca; Hodgson, Carol L.

In: Critical Care Clinics, Vol. 34, No. 4, 01.10.2018, p. 557-571.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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