Early management of severe traumatic brain injury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

200 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Severe traumatic brain injury remains a major health-care problem worldwide. Although major progress has been made in understanding of the pathophysiology of this injury, this has not yet led to substantial improvements in outcome. In this report, we address present knowledge and its limitations, research innovations, and clinical implications. Improved outcomes for patients with severe traumatic brain injury could result from progress in pharmacological and other treatments, neural repair and regeneration, optimisation of surgical indications and techniques, and combination and individually targeted treatments. Expanded classification of traumatic brain injury and innovations in research design will underpin these advances. We are optimistic that further gains in outcome for patients with severe traumatic brain injury will be achieved in the next decade.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1088 - 1098
Number of pages11
JournalThe Lancet
Volume380
Issue number9847
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Cite this

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title = "Early management of severe traumatic brain injury",
abstract = "Severe traumatic brain injury remains a major health-care problem worldwide. Although major progress has been made in understanding of the pathophysiology of this injury, this has not yet led to substantial improvements in outcome. In this report, we address present knowledge and its limitations, research innovations, and clinical implications. Improved outcomes for patients with severe traumatic brain injury could result from progress in pharmacological and other treatments, neural repair and regeneration, optimisation of surgical indications and techniques, and combination and individually targeted treatments. Expanded classification of traumatic brain injury and innovations in research design will underpin these advances. We are optimistic that further gains in outcome for patients with severe traumatic brain injury will be achieved in the next decade.",
author = "Rosenfeld, {Jeffrey Victor} and Maas, {Andrew I} and Peter Bragge and Morganti-Kossmann, {Maria Cristina} and Manley, {Geoffrey T} and Gruen, {Russell Lindsay}",
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Early management of severe traumatic brain injury. / Rosenfeld, Jeffrey Victor; Maas, Andrew I; Bragge, Peter; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina; Manley, Geoffrey T; Gruen, Russell Lindsay.

In: The Lancet, Vol. 380, No. 9847, 2012, p. 1088 - 1098.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Rosenfeld, Jeffrey Victor

AU - Maas, Andrew I

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AU - Gruen, Russell Lindsay

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