E Pluribus Unum

A Transnational Reading of Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This article questions both the Englishness and generic stasis ascribed to Agatha Christie and argues that her Murder on the Orient Express (1933) displays an inherent transnationalism that questions the strict taxonomies supposedly separating the English clue-puzzle from the American private-eye novel.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-19
Number of pages11
JournalClues: a journal of detection
Volume36
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Agatha Christie
  • hardboiled fiction
  • Murder on the Orient Express
  • National identity
  • Transnationalism

Cite this

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title = "E Pluribus Unum: A Transnational Reading of Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express",
abstract = "This article questions both the Englishness and generic stasis ascribed to Agatha Christie and argues that her Murder on the Orient Express (1933) displays an inherent transnationalism that questions the strict taxonomies supposedly separating the English clue-puzzle from the American private-eye novel.",
keywords = "Agatha Christie, hardboiled fiction, Murder on the Orient Express, National identity, Transnationalism",
author = "Stewart King",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
volume = "36",
pages = "9--19",
journal = "Clues: a journal of detection",
issn = "0742-4248",
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}

E Pluribus Unum : A Transnational Reading of Agatha Christie's Murder on the Orient Express. / King, Stewart.

In: Clues: a journal of detection, Vol. 36, No. 1, 2018, p. 9-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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KW - hardboiled fiction

KW - Murder on the Orient Express

KW - National identity

KW - Transnationalism

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JO - Clues: a journal of detection

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