Drug-related problems in the community setting: Pharmacists' findings and recommendations for people with mental illnesses

J. Simon Bell, Paula Whitehead, Parisa Aslani, Andrew J. McLachlan, Timothy F. Chen

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43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and objective: Adverse drug events are a leading cause of morbidity in Australia and internationally. People taking psychotropic drugs for mental illnesses may be particularly susceptible. This study aimed to classify and describe pharmacists' Home Medicines Review (HMR) findings and recommendations for people with mental illnesses. Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted from March to November 2003. General practitioners and community pharmacists practising in two regions of metropolitan Sydney were invited to participate. General practitioners recruited and referred community-dwelling people with mental illnesses to receive HMRs conducted by accredited pharmacists. Reviewing pharmacists interviewed 49 people in their homes. During the interviews the pharmacists provided drug information, assessed drug knowledge and beliefs, and assessed drug adherence. Pharmacists then produced written referenced reports that outlined drug-, patient- and prescriber-related findings and recommendations. These findings and recommendations were presented to the referring general practitioners at follow-up case conferences. Main outcome measures: Drugs were classified using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. Pharmacists' findings and recommendations were classified using the Clinical Pharmacy Activity Classification System. Results: The most common types of nervous system drugs taken by people who received a HMR were antidepressants (n = 39.33%), analgesics (n = 29.24%) and antipsychotics (n = 17.14%). Pharmacists reported 403 findings and made 360 recommendations for 49 people, with 90% of recommendations being accepted by the referring general practitioners. The most common findings related to potential adverse drug reactions (n = 53, for 47% of people), suspected adverse drug reactions (n = 48, for 55% of people), potential interactions (n = 30, for 37% of people), and people taking additional drugs unbeknown to their referring general practitioner (n = 26, for 25% of people). The most common recommendations were to switch a drug (n = 37, for 49% of people), suggest a non-drug treatment (n = 29, for 41% of people) and to suggest a new drug (n = 27, for 49% of people). At the time of referral, general practitioners documented people to be taking 7.8 ± 4.4 (mean ± SD) drugs each (range 1-18). Following home interviews, pharmacists determined people to be taking 9.1 ± 4.8 drugs (range 1-20). This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Pharmacists identified a high incidence of drug-related problems among people receiving treatment for mental illnesses. Pharmacists also identified a higher incidence of overall drug use than documented by the referring general practitioners. HMRs and case conferences, undertaken collaboratively by general practitioners and pharmacists, may be a useful strategy to identify drug-related problems among people with mental illnesses.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)415-425
Number of pages11
JournalClinical Drug Investigation
Volume26
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jun 2006
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Bell, J. Simon ; Whitehead, Paula ; Aslani, Parisa ; McLachlan, Andrew J. ; Chen, Timothy F. / Drug-related problems in the community setting : Pharmacists' findings and recommendations for people with mental illnesses. In: Clinical Drug Investigation. 2006 ; Vol. 26, No. 7. pp. 415-425.
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title = "Drug-related problems in the community setting: Pharmacists' findings and recommendations for people with mental illnesses",
abstract = "Background and objective: Adverse drug events are a leading cause of morbidity in Australia and internationally. People taking psychotropic drugs for mental illnesses may be particularly susceptible. This study aimed to classify and describe pharmacists' Home Medicines Review (HMR) findings and recommendations for people with mental illnesses. Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted from March to November 2003. General practitioners and community pharmacists practising in two regions of metropolitan Sydney were invited to participate. General practitioners recruited and referred community-dwelling people with mental illnesses to receive HMRs conducted by accredited pharmacists. Reviewing pharmacists interviewed 49 people in their homes. During the interviews the pharmacists provided drug information, assessed drug knowledge and beliefs, and assessed drug adherence. Pharmacists then produced written referenced reports that outlined drug-, patient- and prescriber-related findings and recommendations. These findings and recommendations were presented to the referring general practitioners at follow-up case conferences. Main outcome measures: Drugs were classified using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. Pharmacists' findings and recommendations were classified using the Clinical Pharmacy Activity Classification System. Results: The most common types of nervous system drugs taken by people who received a HMR were antidepressants (n = 39.33{\%}), analgesics (n = 29.24{\%}) and antipsychotics (n = 17.14{\%}). Pharmacists reported 403 findings and made 360 recommendations for 49 people, with 90{\%} of recommendations being accepted by the referring general practitioners. The most common findings related to potential adverse drug reactions (n = 53, for 47{\%} of people), suspected adverse drug reactions (n = 48, for 55{\%} of people), potential interactions (n = 30, for 37{\%} of people), and people taking additional drugs unbeknown to their referring general practitioner (n = 26, for 25{\%} of people). The most common recommendations were to switch a drug (n = 37, for 49{\%} of people), suggest a non-drug treatment (n = 29, for 41{\%} of people) and to suggest a new drug (n = 27, for 49{\%} of people). At the time of referral, general practitioners documented people to be taking 7.8 ± 4.4 (mean ± SD) drugs each (range 1-18). Following home interviews, pharmacists determined people to be taking 9.1 ± 4.8 drugs (range 1-20). This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Pharmacists identified a high incidence of drug-related problems among people receiving treatment for mental illnesses. Pharmacists also identified a higher incidence of overall drug use than documented by the referring general practitioners. HMRs and case conferences, undertaken collaboratively by general practitioners and pharmacists, may be a useful strategy to identify drug-related problems among people with mental illnesses.",
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Drug-related problems in the community setting : Pharmacists' findings and recommendations for people with mental illnesses. / Bell, J. Simon; Whitehead, Paula; Aslani, Parisa; McLachlan, Andrew J.; Chen, Timothy F.

In: Clinical Drug Investigation, Vol. 26, No. 7, 28.06.2006, p. 415-425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Drug-related problems in the community setting

T2 - Pharmacists' findings and recommendations for people with mental illnesses

AU - Bell, J. Simon

AU - Whitehead, Paula

AU - Aslani, Parisa

AU - McLachlan, Andrew J.

AU - Chen, Timothy F.

PY - 2006/6/28

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N2 - Background and objective: Adverse drug events are a leading cause of morbidity in Australia and internationally. People taking psychotropic drugs for mental illnesses may be particularly susceptible. This study aimed to classify and describe pharmacists' Home Medicines Review (HMR) findings and recommendations for people with mental illnesses. Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted from March to November 2003. General practitioners and community pharmacists practising in two regions of metropolitan Sydney were invited to participate. General practitioners recruited and referred community-dwelling people with mental illnesses to receive HMRs conducted by accredited pharmacists. Reviewing pharmacists interviewed 49 people in their homes. During the interviews the pharmacists provided drug information, assessed drug knowledge and beliefs, and assessed drug adherence. Pharmacists then produced written referenced reports that outlined drug-, patient- and prescriber-related findings and recommendations. These findings and recommendations were presented to the referring general practitioners at follow-up case conferences. Main outcome measures: Drugs were classified using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. Pharmacists' findings and recommendations were classified using the Clinical Pharmacy Activity Classification System. Results: The most common types of nervous system drugs taken by people who received a HMR were antidepressants (n = 39.33%), analgesics (n = 29.24%) and antipsychotics (n = 17.14%). Pharmacists reported 403 findings and made 360 recommendations for 49 people, with 90% of recommendations being accepted by the referring general practitioners. The most common findings related to potential adverse drug reactions (n = 53, for 47% of people), suspected adverse drug reactions (n = 48, for 55% of people), potential interactions (n = 30, for 37% of people), and people taking additional drugs unbeknown to their referring general practitioner (n = 26, for 25% of people). The most common recommendations were to switch a drug (n = 37, for 49% of people), suggest a non-drug treatment (n = 29, for 41% of people) and to suggest a new drug (n = 27, for 49% of people). At the time of referral, general practitioners documented people to be taking 7.8 ± 4.4 (mean ± SD) drugs each (range 1-18). Following home interviews, pharmacists determined people to be taking 9.1 ± 4.8 drugs (range 1-20). This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Pharmacists identified a high incidence of drug-related problems among people receiving treatment for mental illnesses. Pharmacists also identified a higher incidence of overall drug use than documented by the referring general practitioners. HMRs and case conferences, undertaken collaboratively by general practitioners and pharmacists, may be a useful strategy to identify drug-related problems among people with mental illnesses.

AB - Background and objective: Adverse drug events are a leading cause of morbidity in Australia and internationally. People taking psychotropic drugs for mental illnesses may be particularly susceptible. This study aimed to classify and describe pharmacists' Home Medicines Review (HMR) findings and recommendations for people with mental illnesses. Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted from March to November 2003. General practitioners and community pharmacists practising in two regions of metropolitan Sydney were invited to participate. General practitioners recruited and referred community-dwelling people with mental illnesses to receive HMRs conducted by accredited pharmacists. Reviewing pharmacists interviewed 49 people in their homes. During the interviews the pharmacists provided drug information, assessed drug knowledge and beliefs, and assessed drug adherence. Pharmacists then produced written referenced reports that outlined drug-, patient- and prescriber-related findings and recommendations. These findings and recommendations were presented to the referring general practitioners at follow-up case conferences. Main outcome measures: Drugs were classified using the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System. Pharmacists' findings and recommendations were classified using the Clinical Pharmacy Activity Classification System. Results: The most common types of nervous system drugs taken by people who received a HMR were antidepressants (n = 39.33%), analgesics (n = 29.24%) and antipsychotics (n = 17.14%). Pharmacists reported 403 findings and made 360 recommendations for 49 people, with 90% of recommendations being accepted by the referring general practitioners. The most common findings related to potential adverse drug reactions (n = 53, for 47% of people), suspected adverse drug reactions (n = 48, for 55% of people), potential interactions (n = 30, for 37% of people), and people taking additional drugs unbeknown to their referring general practitioner (n = 26, for 25% of people). The most common recommendations were to switch a drug (n = 37, for 49% of people), suggest a non-drug treatment (n = 29, for 41% of people) and to suggest a new drug (n = 27, for 49% of people). At the time of referral, general practitioners documented people to be taking 7.8 ± 4.4 (mean ± SD) drugs each (range 1-18). Following home interviews, pharmacists determined people to be taking 9.1 ± 4.8 drugs (range 1-20). This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Pharmacists identified a high incidence of drug-related problems among people receiving treatment for mental illnesses. Pharmacists also identified a higher incidence of overall drug use than documented by the referring general practitioners. HMRs and case conferences, undertaken collaboratively by general practitioners and pharmacists, may be a useful strategy to identify drug-related problems among people with mental illnesses.

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