Dose-dependent absorption of chlorogenic acids in the small intestine assessed by coffee consumption in ileostomists

Thomas Erk, Gary Williamson, Mathieu Renouf, Cynthia Marmet, Heike Steiling, Fabiola Dionisi, Denis Barron, Ralf Melcher, Elke Richling

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46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Scope: Until now, the question of how the ingested doses of chlorogenic acids (CGA) from coffee influence their absorption and metabolism remains unresolved. To assess absorption in the small intestine, we performed a dose-response study with a randomized, double-blinded, crossover design with ileostomist subjects. Methods and results: After a polyphenol-free diet, the volunteers consumed, on three separate occasions, coffee with different total CGA contents (high 4525 μmol; medium 2219 μmol; low 1053 μmol). CGA concentrations in plasma, ileal effluent, and urine were subsequently determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS and -ESI-MS/MS. The results show that the consumption of higher CGA concentrations leads to a faster ileal excretion. This corresponds to a renal excretion of 8.0 ± 4.9% (high), 12.1 ± 6.7% (medium), and 14.6 ± 6.8% (low) of total CGA and metabolites. Glucuronidation of CGA became slightly greater with increasing dose. After enzyme treatment, the area under the curve (AUC)0-8h for CGA metabolites in plasma was 4412 ± 751 nM × h0-8 -1 (high), 2394 ± 637 nM × h0-8 -1 (medium), 1782 ± 731 nM × h0-8 -1 (low), respectively. Additionally, we were able to identify new metabolites of CGA in urine and ileal fluid. Conclusion: We conclude that the consumption of high CGA concentrations via coffee might influence the gastrointestinal transit time and consequently affect CGA absorption and metabolism.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1488-1500
Number of pages13
JournalMolecular Nutrition & Food Research
Volume56
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Chlorogenic acids
  • Coffee
  • Dose response
  • Ileostomy
  • Quinic acid

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