'Don't drag us into this': Growing Up South Sudanese in Victoria after the 2016 Moomba 'riot'

Kathryn Jayne Benier, Jarrett Blume Blaustein, Diana Johns, Sara Leanne Maher

Research output: Other contributionOtherpeer-review

Abstract

This report presents the findings from the first phase of an ongoing research project titled Intergenerational Perspectives on the Criminalization of Young People from the South Sudanese Community in Victoria (2017–19). The study is a collaboration between the Centre for Multicultural Youth (CMY) and researchers from both the Monash Migration and Inclusion Centre (MMIC) at Monash University and the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Melbourne.

The report explores young South Sudanese Australians’ perceptions of how they have been impacted by ongoing media coverage of ‘Apex’ and ‘African gangs’ since the 2016 Moomba ‘riot’. The study was prompted by concerns about a noticeable increase in racialised crime reporting that became an enduring fixture of the local media in Victoria following the disorder at Moomba and the subsequent suggestion by some journalists and politicians that there is an ‘African gang’ presence in Melbourne. Community leaders, senior police officers, progressive journalists and academics have repeatedly voiced their concern about these narratives, yet rarely have the voices of the young people from the South Sudanese community themselves featured prominently in this discussion. Accordingly, the aim of phase 1 of this research was to amplify the voices of young South Sudanese Australians who have been the subject of much of this media coverage.
Original languageEnglish
TypeResearch Report
Number of pages52
Place of PublicationCarlton, Victoria
ISBN (Electronic)9780646597614
Publication statusPublished - 31 Oct 2018

Cite this

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title = "'Don't drag us into this': Growing Up South Sudanese in Victoria after the 2016 Moomba 'riot'",
abstract = "This report presents the findings from the first phase of an ongoing research project titled Intergenerational Perspectives on the Criminalization of Young People from the South Sudanese Community in Victoria (2017–19). The study is a collaboration between the Centre for Multicultural Youth (CMY) and researchers from both the Monash Migration and Inclusion Centre (MMIC) at Monash University and the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Melbourne. The report explores young South Sudanese Australians’ perceptions of how they have been impacted by ongoing media coverage of ‘Apex’ and ‘African gangs’ since the 2016 Moomba ‘riot’. The study was prompted by concerns about a noticeable increase in racialised crime reporting that became an enduring fixture of the local media in Victoria following the disorder at Moomba and the subsequent suggestion by some journalists and politicians that there is an ‘African gang’ presence in Melbourne. Community leaders, senior police officers, progressive journalists and academics have repeatedly voiced their concern about these narratives, yet rarely have the voices of the young people from the South Sudanese community themselves featured prominently in this discussion. Accordingly, the aim of phase 1 of this research was to amplify the voices of young South Sudanese Australians who have been the subject of much of this media coverage.",
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'Don't drag us into this': Growing Up South Sudanese in Victoria after the 2016 Moomba 'riot'. / Benier, Kathryn Jayne; Blaustein, Jarrett Blume; Johns, Diana ; Maher, Sara Leanne.

52 p. Carlton, Victoria. 2018, Research Report.

Research output: Other contributionOtherpeer-review

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