Does Violence in Adolescence Differentially Predict Offending Patterns in Early Adulthood?

Stephanie M. Cardwell, Alex R. Piquero

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous research is mixed on whether the commission of a violent offense in adolescence is predictive of criminal career characteristics. In the current study, we addressed the following: (a) What factors predict the commission of serious violence in mid-adolescence? and (b) Does involvement in serious violence in mid-adolescence lead to more chronic and/or more heterogeneous patterns of offending in early adulthood? Data were obtained from the Pathways to Desistance Study, a longitudinal study of serious adolescent offenders in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and Phoenix, Arizona. Prior arrests, violence exposure, and gang involvement distinguished adolescents who engaged in violence at baseline. A violent offense at baseline was not predictive of a higher frequency of rearrests but was associated with membership in the low offending trajectory. In conclusion, violent offending in adolescence might be a poor predictor of chronic and heterogeneous patterns of offending throughout the life course.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1603-1628
Number of pages26
JournalInternational Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
Volume62
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • adolescence
  • early adulthood
  • Pathways to Desistance
  • trajectories
  • violent offending

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