Does risk-based coagulation screening predict intraventricular haemorrhage in extreme premature infants?

Thao T.H. Tran, Alex Veldman, Atul Malhotra

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) continues to be a significant contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in the extremely premature population (<26 weeks). The aims of the study were to test the hypothesis that risk-based coagulopathy screening could identify infants at risk of severe IVH/mortality, and whether preterm infants born at less than 26 weeks of gestation who received early (within first 48h) fresh frozen plasma (FFP) had a lower incidence of IVH than those who did not. METHOD: Chart review of preterm infants born less than 26-week gestation was conducted. The study compared two cohorts of infants who either had 'early' risk-based coagulopathy screening (within first 48h, n=47) or 'late' screening (n=55). RESULTS: Baseline and clinical characteristics of the two cohorts were similar. 'Early' coagulopathy screening predicted infants at risk of severe IVH [relative risk (RR) 2.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-5.67, P<0.01] but not mortality (RR 1.2, 95% CI 0.79-1.94). FFP was administered significantly more in the 'early' screened cohort (P<0.001); however, the incidence of IVH was similar in those who received early FFP administration than those who did not. CONCLUSIONS: 'Early' risk-based coagulopathy screening may identify preterm infants at risk of severe IVH; however, the study failed to show any benefit of early treatment of a coagulopathy with FFP in a small but high-risk population. 

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)532-536
Number of pages5
JournalBlood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis
Volume23
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2012

Keywords

  • coagulopathy
  • intraventricular haemorrhage
  • preterm

Cite this

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title = "Does risk-based coagulation screening predict intraventricular haemorrhage in extreme premature infants?",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) continues to be a significant contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in the extremely premature population (<26 weeks). The aims of the study were to test the hypothesis that risk-based coagulopathy screening could identify infants at risk of severe IVH/mortality, and whether preterm infants born at less than 26 weeks of gestation who received early (within first 48h) fresh frozen plasma (FFP) had a lower incidence of IVH than those who did not. METHOD: Chart review of preterm infants born less than 26-week gestation was conducted. The study compared two cohorts of infants who either had 'early' risk-based coagulopathy screening (within first 48h, n=47) or 'late' screening (n=55). RESULTS: Baseline and clinical characteristics of the two cohorts were similar. 'Early' coagulopathy screening predicted infants at risk of severe IVH [relative risk (RR) 2.59, 95{\%} confidence interval (CI) 1.18-5.67, P<0.01] but not mortality (RR 1.2, 95{\%} CI 0.79-1.94). FFP was administered significantly more in the 'early' screened cohort (P<0.001); however, the incidence of IVH was similar in those who received early FFP administration than those who did not. CONCLUSIONS: 'Early' risk-based coagulopathy screening may identify preterm infants at risk of severe IVH; however, the study failed to show any benefit of early treatment of a coagulopathy with FFP in a small but high-risk population. ",
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Does risk-based coagulation screening predict intraventricular haemorrhage in extreme premature infants? / Tran, Thao T.H.; Veldman, Alex; Malhotra, Atul.

In: Blood Coagulation and Fibrinolysis, Vol. 23, No. 6, 09.2012, p. 532-536.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Does risk-based coagulation screening predict intraventricular haemorrhage in extreme premature infants?

AU - Tran, Thao T.H.

AU - Veldman, Alex

AU - Malhotra, Atul

PY - 2012/9

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N2 - BACKGROUND: Intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) continues to be a significant contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in the extremely premature population (<26 weeks). The aims of the study were to test the hypothesis that risk-based coagulopathy screening could identify infants at risk of severe IVH/mortality, and whether preterm infants born at less than 26 weeks of gestation who received early (within first 48h) fresh frozen plasma (FFP) had a lower incidence of IVH than those who did not. METHOD: Chart review of preterm infants born less than 26-week gestation was conducted. The study compared two cohorts of infants who either had 'early' risk-based coagulopathy screening (within first 48h, n=47) or 'late' screening (n=55). RESULTS: Baseline and clinical characteristics of the two cohorts were similar. 'Early' coagulopathy screening predicted infants at risk of severe IVH [relative risk (RR) 2.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-5.67, P<0.01] but not mortality (RR 1.2, 95% CI 0.79-1.94). FFP was administered significantly more in the 'early' screened cohort (P<0.001); however, the incidence of IVH was similar in those who received early FFP administration than those who did not. CONCLUSIONS: 'Early' risk-based coagulopathy screening may identify preterm infants at risk of severe IVH; however, the study failed to show any benefit of early treatment of a coagulopathy with FFP in a small but high-risk population. 

AB - BACKGROUND: Intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) continues to be a significant contributor to neonatal morbidity and mortality, especially in the extremely premature population (<26 weeks). The aims of the study were to test the hypothesis that risk-based coagulopathy screening could identify infants at risk of severe IVH/mortality, and whether preterm infants born at less than 26 weeks of gestation who received early (within first 48h) fresh frozen plasma (FFP) had a lower incidence of IVH than those who did not. METHOD: Chart review of preterm infants born less than 26-week gestation was conducted. The study compared two cohorts of infants who either had 'early' risk-based coagulopathy screening (within first 48h, n=47) or 'late' screening (n=55). RESULTS: Baseline and clinical characteristics of the two cohorts were similar. 'Early' coagulopathy screening predicted infants at risk of severe IVH [relative risk (RR) 2.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.18-5.67, P<0.01] but not mortality (RR 1.2, 95% CI 0.79-1.94). FFP was administered significantly more in the 'early' screened cohort (P<0.001); however, the incidence of IVH was similar in those who received early FFP administration than those who did not. CONCLUSIONS: 'Early' risk-based coagulopathy screening may identify preterm infants at risk of severe IVH; however, the study failed to show any benefit of early treatment of a coagulopathy with FFP in a small but high-risk population. 

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