Do stereotypes strike twice? Giftedness and gender stereotypes in pre-service teachers' beliefs about student characteristics in Australia

Svenja Matheis, Lena Kristina Keller, Leonie Kronborg, Manfred Schmitt, Franzis Preckel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Stereotypes influence teachers’ perception of and behaviour towards students, thus shaping students’ learning opportunities. The present study investigated how 315 Australian pre-service teachers’ stereotypes about giftedness and gender are related to their perception of students’ intellectual ability, adjustment, and social-emotional ability, using an experimental vignette approach and controlling for social desirability in pre-service teachers’ responses. Repeated-measures ANOVA showed that pre-service teachers associated giftedness with higher intellectual ability, but with less adjustment compared to average-ability students. Furthermore, pre-service teachers perceived male students as less socially and emotionally competent and less adjusted than female students. Additionally, pre-service teachers seemed to perceive female average-ability students’ adjustment as most favourable compared to male average-ability students and gifted students. Findings point to discrepancies between actual characteristics of gifted female and male students and stereotypes in teachers’ beliefs. Consequences of stereotyping and implications for teacher education are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages20
JournalAsia - Pacific Journal of Teacher Education
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 18 Feb 2019

Keywords

  • teacher beliefs
  • stereotypes
  • giftedness
  • gender
  • teacher education
  • Australian culture

Cite this

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title = "Do stereotypes strike twice? Giftedness and gender stereotypes in pre-service teachers' beliefs about student characteristics in Australia",
abstract = "Stereotypes influence teachers’ perception of and behaviour towards students, thus shaping students’ learning opportunities. The present study investigated how 315 Australian pre-service teachers’ stereotypes about giftedness and gender are related to their perception of students’ intellectual ability, adjustment, and social-emotional ability, using an experimental vignette approach and controlling for social desirability in pre-service teachers’ responses. Repeated-measures ANOVA showed that pre-service teachers associated giftedness with higher intellectual ability, but with less adjustment compared to average-ability students. Furthermore, pre-service teachers perceived male students as less socially and emotionally competent and less adjusted than female students. Additionally, pre-service teachers seemed to perceive female average-ability students’ adjustment as most favourable compared to male average-ability students and gifted students. Findings point to discrepancies between actual characteristics of gifted female and male students and stereotypes in teachers’ beliefs. Consequences of stereotyping and implications for teacher education are discussed.",
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Do stereotypes strike twice? Giftedness and gender stereotypes in pre-service teachers' beliefs about student characteristics in Australia. / Matheis, Svenja; Keller, Lena Kristina; Kronborg, Leonie; Schmitt, Manfred; Preckel, Franzis.

In: Asia - Pacific Journal of Teacher Education, 18.02.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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