Distress, Demoralisation And Depression In Palliative Care

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Recognition and management of distress is an integral part of total health care. Whereas most physical symptoms can be fairly effectively ameliorated in palliative care, existential distress poses a distinct hurdle for many clinicians. When patients or their families express anguish, despair and dread, our clinical response must draw on a range of management skills, many of which constitute the most fundamental forms of good supportive medicine. This paper aims to equip the practitioner with a clinical approach to issues of distress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)14-19
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Therapeutics
Volume41
Issue number6
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2000

Cite this

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Distress, Demoralisation And Depression In Palliative Care. / Kissane, David W.

In: Current Therapeutics, Vol. 41, No. 6, 01.12.2000, p. 14-19.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview ArticleResearchpeer-review

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