Disruptive innovation in health care: Business models, moral orders and electronic records

Karin Garrety, Ian Patrick McLoughlin, Gregor Zelle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There is widespread consensus that current healthcare costs are unsustainable, and that efficiencies could be achieved by reorganising care and making greater use of information technology, in particular nationally available electronic health records. Such approaches have, however, been difficult to implement, partly because incentives for uptake are weak. In this article we argue that the difficulties go deeper than calculations of costs and benefits, and include disruptions to the complex moral orders that surround the production and exchange of health information. Using the introduction of national electronic health records in England and Australia as examples, we show how attempts to reshape and transfer distributions of rights and responsibilities developed in the age of paper into the digital world go awry. We suggest that a fundamental rethinking of the role of records in healthcare may be an integral component of the moral re-ordering required to transform health care through such means.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)579 - 592
Number of pages14
JournalSocial Policy and Society
Volume13
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

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Disruptive innovation in health care: Business models, moral orders and electronic records. / Garrety, Karin; McLoughlin, Ian Patrick; Zelle, Gregor.

In: Social Policy and Society, Vol. 13, No. 4, 2014, p. 579 - 592.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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