Discrimination makes me sick! An examination of the discrimination-health relationship

David Johnston, Grace Lordan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The attitudes of the general British population towards Muslims changed post 2001, and this change led to a significant increase in Anti-Muslim discrimination. We use this exogenous attitude change to estimate the causal impact of increased discrimination on a range of objective and subjective health outcomes. The difference-in-differences estimates indicate that discrimination worsens blood pressure, cholesterol, BMI and self-assessed general health. Thus, discrimination is a potentially important determinant of the large racial and ethnic health gaps observed in many countries. We also investigate the pathways through which discrimination impacts upon health, and find that discrimination has a negative effect on employment, perceived social support, and health-producing behaviours. Crucially, our results hold for different control groups and model specifications.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)99 - 111
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Health Economics
Volume31
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

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