Discriminating facial expressions of emotion and its link with perceiving visual form in Parkinson's disease

Michelle Marneweck, Geoff Hammond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We investigated the link between the ability to perceive facial expressions of emotion and the ability to perceive visual form in Parkinson's disease (PD). We assessed in individuals with PD and healthy controls the ability to discriminate graded intensities of facial expressions of anger from neutral expressions and the ability to discriminate radial frequency (RF) patterns with modulations in amplitude from a perfect circle. Those with PD were, as a group, impaired relative to controls in discriminating graded intensities of angry from neutral expressions and discriminating modulated amplitudes of RF patterns from perfect circles; these two abilities correlated positively and moderately to highly, even after removing the variance that was shared with disease progression and general cognitive functioning. The results indicate that the impaired ability to perceive visual form is likely to contribute to the impaired ability to perceive facial expressions of emotion in PD, and that both are related to the progression of the disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)149-155
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume346
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2014
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Emotion perception
  • Facial expressions
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Radial frequency pattern
  • Visual form perception
  • Visual function

Cite this