Disciplinary Inqu[ee]ry in Computational Physics

Anna Mclean Phillips, Ezra Gouvea, Brian Gravel, Timothy J. Atherton

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference PaperOther

Abstract

As opposed to practices that reinforce inequitable power structures, disciplinary practices in STEM that converge with themes of resistance (identified through Critical analysis) are better suited to support marginalized students. We identify two instances (within the setting of a computational physics course) where we notice resonance between disciplinary practices and queer theory. We use this queer reading of our learning environment to explore possibilities for queering physics education. We argue that identifying and amplifying STEM practices that are compatible with such themes can support justice-oriented pedagogy and align with efforts to incorporate agency and scientific practices into Physics classrooms.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationPhysics Education Research Conference, 2022
EditorsBrian Frank, Dyan Jones, Qing Ryan
PublisherAmerican Association of Physics Teachers (AAPT)
Pages353-358
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)9781931024389
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Sep 2022
Externally publishedYes
EventPhysics Education Research Conference, 2022 - Grand Rapids, United States of America
Duration: 13 Jul 202214 Jul 2022
https://www.per-central.org/conferences/2022/

Publication series

NamePhysics Education Research Conference Proceedings
ISSN (Print)1539-9028
ISSN (Electronic)2377-2379

Conference

ConferencePhysics Education Research Conference, 2022
Abbreviated titlePERC 2022
Country/TerritoryUnited States of America
CityGrand Rapids
Period13/07/2214/07/22
OtherPERC 2022 focused on "queering physics education" through an intersectional lens. By "queering," we centered queer theory which breaks down social constructions and hierarchies to unpack normalized assumptions. In the context of physics education, we apply the theory to unpack who has power in physics to control the production of future physicists, how physics policies and practices are sometimes built on ideas of punishment and power, and how PER embeds binaries in both its content and sociological research. Further, we wanted to encourage a dialogue that is both a critique and an imagining of a queer future for PER. Explicit attention was given to constructions of race, (dis)ability, gender, sexuality and how they interact and impact lived experiences.
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