Disaggregated energy demand by fuel type and economic growth in Malaysia

Hooi Hooi Lean, Russell Leigh Smyth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We use an augmented production function approach to examine the relationship between disaggregated energy consumption by fuel type and economic growth in Malaysia. The main finding is that diesel is the major contributor to economic growth in the long run in Malaysia. The long run elasticity for diesel is 0.4, which is similar to our finding for total energy consumption. The problem for Malaysia is that diesel is a major cause of acidification and greenhouse emissions and that Malaysia s reserves of oil are depleting. The results for diesel suggest that the challenge moving forward for Malaysia will be to replace diesel with cleaner biodiesel alternatives, while not adversely affecting Malaysia s current high rate of economic growth. The prospects for so doing, and measures taken thus far in Malaysia, are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)168 - 177
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Energy
Volume132
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

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abstract = "We use an augmented production function approach to examine the relationship between disaggregated energy consumption by fuel type and economic growth in Malaysia. The main finding is that diesel is the major contributor to economic growth in the long run in Malaysia. The long run elasticity for diesel is 0.4, which is similar to our finding for total energy consumption. The problem for Malaysia is that diesel is a major cause of acidification and greenhouse emissions and that Malaysia s reserves of oil are depleting. The results for diesel suggest that the challenge moving forward for Malaysia will be to replace diesel with cleaner biodiesel alternatives, while not adversely affecting Malaysia s current high rate of economic growth. The prospects for so doing, and measures taken thus far in Malaysia, are discussed.",
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Disaggregated energy demand by fuel type and economic growth in Malaysia. / Lean, Hooi Hooi; Smyth, Russell Leigh.

In: Applied Energy, Vol. 132, 2014, p. 168 - 177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Smyth, Russell Leigh

PY - 2014

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AB - We use an augmented production function approach to examine the relationship between disaggregated energy consumption by fuel type and economic growth in Malaysia. The main finding is that diesel is the major contributor to economic growth in the long run in Malaysia. The long run elasticity for diesel is 0.4, which is similar to our finding for total energy consumption. The problem for Malaysia is that diesel is a major cause of acidification and greenhouse emissions and that Malaysia s reserves of oil are depleting. The results for diesel suggest that the challenge moving forward for Malaysia will be to replace diesel with cleaner biodiesel alternatives, while not adversely affecting Malaysia s current high rate of economic growth. The prospects for so doing, and measures taken thus far in Malaysia, are discussed.

U2 - 10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.06.071

DO - 10.1016/j.apenergy.2014.06.071

M3 - Article

VL - 132

SP - 168

EP - 177

JO - Applied Energy

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SN - 0306-2619

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