Digital weapons in a post-conflict society

Faith Gordon, Paul Reilly

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

This chapter will explore the relatively under-researched issue of how social media is used in relation to paramilitary style assaults in Northern Ireland. Drawing on the preliminary findings from an ongoing study by the authors, it will explore how social media platforms such as Facebook and Twitter are being monitored by
the police in order to identify such incidents and to encourage citizens to report them to the authorities. The chapter concludes by assessing the impact of the #stopattacks campaign and the role of community-based organisations and youth workers in establishing an alternative discourse in this area.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationAnti-Social Media?
Subtitle of host publicationThe Impact on Journalism and Society
EditorsJohn Mair, Tor Clark, Neil Fowler, Raymond Snoddy, Richard Tait
Place of PublicationSuffolk UK
PublisherAbramis Academic
Pages259-264
Number of pages6
Volume1
Edition1
ISBN (Print)9781845497293
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • social media
  • crime
  • post-conflict societies
  • punishment

Cite this

Gordon, F., & Reilly , P. (2018). Digital weapons in a post-conflict society. In J. Mair, T. Clark, N. Fowler, R. Snoddy, & R. Tait (Eds.), Anti-Social Media? : The Impact on Journalism and Society (1 ed., Vol. 1, pp. 259-264). Abramis Academic.