Differential dopamine receptor D4 allele association with ADHD dependent of proband season of birth

Keeley Joanne Brookes, Benjamin M Neale, Xaiohui Xu, Anita Thapar, Michael Gill, Kate Langley, Ziarih Hawi, Jonathan S Mill, Eric T Taylor, Barbara Franke, Wai Chen, Richard P Ebstein, Jan K Buitelaar, Tobias Banaschewski, Edmund J S Sonuga-Barke, Jacques Eisenberg, Iris Manor, Ana Lucia Miranda, Robert D Oades, Herbert Roeyers & 5 others Aribert Rothenberger, Joseph A Sergeant, Hans Christoph Steinhausen, Stephen V Faraone, Philip J Asherson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Season of birth (SOB) has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in two existing studies. One further study reported an interaction between SOB and genotypes of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene. It is important that these findings are further investigated to confirm or refute the findings. In this study, we investigated the SOB association with ADHD in four independent samples collected for molecular genetic studies of ADHD and found a small but significant increase in summer births compared to a large population control dataset. We also observed a significant association with the 7-repeat allele of the DRD4 gene variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in exon three with probands born in the winter season, with no significant differential transmission of this allele between summer and winter seasons. Preferential transmission of the 2-repeat allele to ADHD probands occurred in those who were born during the summer season, but did not surpass significance for association, even though the difference in transmission between the two seasons was nominally significant. However, following adjustment for multiple testing of alleles none of the SOB effects remained significant. We conclude that the DRD4 7-repeat allele is associated with ADHD but there is no association or interaction with SOB for increased risk for ADHD. Our findings suggest that we can refute a possible effect of SOB for ADHD
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)94 - 99
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics
Volume147
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Brookes, Keeley Joanne ; Neale, Benjamin M ; Xu, Xaiohui ; Thapar, Anita ; Gill, Michael ; Langley, Kate ; Hawi, Ziarih ; Mill, Jonathan S ; Taylor, Eric T ; Franke, Barbara ; Chen, Wai ; Ebstein, Richard P ; Buitelaar, Jan K ; Banaschewski, Tobias ; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S ; Eisenberg, Jacques ; Manor, Iris ; Miranda, Ana Lucia ; Oades, Robert D ; Roeyers, Herbert ; Rothenberger, Aribert ; Sergeant, Joseph A ; Steinhausen, Hans Christoph ; Faraone, Stephen V ; Asherson, Philip J. / Differential dopamine receptor D4 allele association with ADHD dependent of proband season of birth. In: American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics. 2008 ; Vol. 147, No. 1. pp. 94 - 99.
@article{10639100e9914a4bbefa8b7c26d3bd75,
title = "Differential dopamine receptor D4 allele association with ADHD dependent of proband season of birth",
abstract = "Season of birth (SOB) has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in two existing studies. One further study reported an interaction between SOB and genotypes of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene. It is important that these findings are further investigated to confirm or refute the findings. In this study, we investigated the SOB association with ADHD in four independent samples collected for molecular genetic studies of ADHD and found a small but significant increase in summer births compared to a large population control dataset. We also observed a significant association with the 7-repeat allele of the DRD4 gene variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in exon three with probands born in the winter season, with no significant differential transmission of this allele between summer and winter seasons. Preferential transmission of the 2-repeat allele to ADHD probands occurred in those who were born during the summer season, but did not surpass significance for association, even though the difference in transmission between the two seasons was nominally significant. However, following adjustment for multiple testing of alleles none of the SOB effects remained significant. We conclude that the DRD4 7-repeat allele is associated with ADHD but there is no association or interaction with SOB for increased risk for ADHD. Our findings suggest that we can refute a possible effect of SOB for ADHD",
author = "Brookes, {Keeley Joanne} and Neale, {Benjamin M} and Xaiohui Xu and Anita Thapar and Michael Gill and Kate Langley and Ziarih Hawi and Mill, {Jonathan S} and Taylor, {Eric T} and Barbara Franke and Wai Chen and Ebstein, {Richard P} and Buitelaar, {Jan K} and Tobias Banaschewski and Sonuga-Barke, {Edmund J S} and Jacques Eisenberg and Iris Manor and Miranda, {Ana Lucia} and Oades, {Robert D} and Herbert Roeyers and Aribert Rothenberger and Sergeant, {Joseph A} and Steinhausen, {Hans Christoph} and Faraone, {Stephen V} and Asherson, {Philip J}",
year = "2008",
doi = "10.1002/ajmg.b.30562",
language = "English",
volume = "147",
pages = "94 -- 99",
journal = "American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics",
issn = "1552-4841",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "1",

}

Brookes, KJ, Neale, BM, Xu, X, Thapar, A, Gill, M, Langley, K, Hawi, Z, Mill, JS, Taylor, ET, Franke, B, Chen, W, Ebstein, RP, Buitelaar, JK, Banaschewski, T, Sonuga-Barke, EJS, Eisenberg, J, Manor, I, Miranda, AL, Oades, RD, Roeyers, H, Rothenberger, A, Sergeant, JA, Steinhausen, HC, Faraone, SV & Asherson, PJ 2008, 'Differential dopamine receptor D4 allele association with ADHD dependent of proband season of birth', American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, vol. 147, no. 1, pp. 94 - 99. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajmg.b.30562

Differential dopamine receptor D4 allele association with ADHD dependent of proband season of birth. / Brookes, Keeley Joanne; Neale, Benjamin M; Xu, Xaiohui; Thapar, Anita; Gill, Michael; Langley, Kate; Hawi, Ziarih ; Mill, Jonathan S; Taylor, Eric T; Franke, Barbara; Chen, Wai; Ebstein, Richard P; Buitelaar, Jan K; Banaschewski, Tobias; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S; Eisenberg, Jacques; Manor, Iris; Miranda, Ana Lucia; Oades, Robert D; Roeyers, Herbert; Rothenberger, Aribert; Sergeant, Joseph A; Steinhausen, Hans Christoph; Faraone, Stephen V; Asherson, Philip J.

In: American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics, Vol. 147, No. 1, 2008, p. 94 - 99.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differential dopamine receptor D4 allele association with ADHD dependent of proband season of birth

AU - Brookes, Keeley Joanne

AU - Neale, Benjamin M

AU - Xu, Xaiohui

AU - Thapar, Anita

AU - Gill, Michael

AU - Langley, Kate

AU - Hawi, Ziarih

AU - Mill, Jonathan S

AU - Taylor, Eric T

AU - Franke, Barbara

AU - Chen, Wai

AU - Ebstein, Richard P

AU - Buitelaar, Jan K

AU - Banaschewski, Tobias

AU - Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J S

AU - Eisenberg, Jacques

AU - Manor, Iris

AU - Miranda, Ana Lucia

AU - Oades, Robert D

AU - Roeyers, Herbert

AU - Rothenberger, Aribert

AU - Sergeant, Joseph A

AU - Steinhausen, Hans Christoph

AU - Faraone, Stephen V

AU - Asherson, Philip J

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Season of birth (SOB) has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in two existing studies. One further study reported an interaction between SOB and genotypes of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene. It is important that these findings are further investigated to confirm or refute the findings. In this study, we investigated the SOB association with ADHD in four independent samples collected for molecular genetic studies of ADHD and found a small but significant increase in summer births compared to a large population control dataset. We also observed a significant association with the 7-repeat allele of the DRD4 gene variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in exon three with probands born in the winter season, with no significant differential transmission of this allele between summer and winter seasons. Preferential transmission of the 2-repeat allele to ADHD probands occurred in those who were born during the summer season, but did not surpass significance for association, even though the difference in transmission between the two seasons was nominally significant. However, following adjustment for multiple testing of alleles none of the SOB effects remained significant. We conclude that the DRD4 7-repeat allele is associated with ADHD but there is no association or interaction with SOB for increased risk for ADHD. Our findings suggest that we can refute a possible effect of SOB for ADHD

AB - Season of birth (SOB) has been associated with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in two existing studies. One further study reported an interaction between SOB and genotypes of the dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) gene. It is important that these findings are further investigated to confirm or refute the findings. In this study, we investigated the SOB association with ADHD in four independent samples collected for molecular genetic studies of ADHD and found a small but significant increase in summer births compared to a large population control dataset. We also observed a significant association with the 7-repeat allele of the DRD4 gene variable number tandem repeat polymorphism in exon three with probands born in the winter season, with no significant differential transmission of this allele between summer and winter seasons. Preferential transmission of the 2-repeat allele to ADHD probands occurred in those who were born during the summer season, but did not surpass significance for association, even though the difference in transmission between the two seasons was nominally significant. However, following adjustment for multiple testing of alleles none of the SOB effects remained significant. We conclude that the DRD4 7-repeat allele is associated with ADHD but there is no association or interaction with SOB for increased risk for ADHD. Our findings suggest that we can refute a possible effect of SOB for ADHD

UR - http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajmg.b.30562/pdf

U2 - 10.1002/ajmg.b.30562

DO - 10.1002/ajmg.b.30562

M3 - Article

VL - 147

SP - 94

EP - 99

JO - American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics

JF - American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics

SN - 1552-4841

IS - 1

ER -