Differences in Characteristics and Exposure to Stressors between Persons with and Without Diagnosed Mental Illness Who Died by Suicide in Victoria, Australia

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Mental illness is an established risk factor for suicide. To develop effective prevention interventions and strategies, the demographic characteristics and stressors (other than, or in addition to, mental illness) that can influence a person's decision to die by suicide need to be identified. Aim: To examine cases of suicide by the presence or absence of a diagnosed mental illness (mental illness status) to identify differences in factors associated with suicide in the groups. Method: Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate mental illness status and exposure to stressors among 2,839 persons who died by suicide in Victoria, Australia (2009-2013), using the Victorian Suicide Register. Results: Females, metropolitan residents, persons treated for physical illness/injury, those exposed to stressors related to isolation, family, work, education, and substance use and those who had made a previous suicide attempt had increased odds of having a diagnosed mental illness. Employed persons had decreased odds of having a diagnosed mental illness. Limitations: The retrospectivity of data collection as well as the validity and reliability of some of the data may be questionable owing to the potential for recall bias. Conclusion: The point of intervention for suicide prevention cannot always be a mental health professional; some people who die by suicide either do not have a mental illness or have not sought help.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalCrisis
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 1 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • mental illness
  • suicide
  • suicide epidemiology
  • suicide stressors

Cite this

@article{5aa1244b021b4ae18d7af055a431c417,
title = "Differences in Characteristics and Exposure to Stressors between Persons with and Without Diagnosed Mental Illness Who Died by Suicide in Victoria, Australia",
abstract = "Background: Mental illness is an established risk factor for suicide. To develop effective prevention interventions and strategies, the demographic characteristics and stressors (other than, or in addition to, mental illness) that can influence a person's decision to die by suicide need to be identified. Aim: To examine cases of suicide by the presence or absence of a diagnosed mental illness (mental illness status) to identify differences in factors associated with suicide in the groups. Method: Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate mental illness status and exposure to stressors among 2,839 persons who died by suicide in Victoria, Australia (2009-2013), using the Victorian Suicide Register. Results: Females, metropolitan residents, persons treated for physical illness/injury, those exposed to stressors related to isolation, family, work, education, and substance use and those who had made a previous suicide attempt had increased odds of having a diagnosed mental illness. Employed persons had decreased odds of having a diagnosed mental illness. Limitations: The retrospectivity of data collection as well as the validity and reliability of some of the data may be questionable owing to the potential for recall bias. Conclusion: The point of intervention for suicide prevention cannot always be a mental health professional; some people who die by suicide either do not have a mental illness or have not sought help.",
keywords = "mental illness, suicide, suicide epidemiology, suicide stressors",
author = "Angela Clapperton and Stuart Newstead and Lyndal Bugeja and Jane Pirkis",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1027/0227-5910/a000553",
language = "English",
journal = "Crisis",
issn = "0227-5910",
publisher = "Hogrefe",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Differences in Characteristics and Exposure to Stressors between Persons with and Without Diagnosed Mental Illness Who Died by Suicide in Victoria, Australia

AU - Clapperton, Angela

AU - Newstead, Stuart

AU - Bugeja, Lyndal

AU - Pirkis, Jane

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Background: Mental illness is an established risk factor for suicide. To develop effective prevention interventions and strategies, the demographic characteristics and stressors (other than, or in addition to, mental illness) that can influence a person's decision to die by suicide need to be identified. Aim: To examine cases of suicide by the presence or absence of a diagnosed mental illness (mental illness status) to identify differences in factors associated with suicide in the groups. Method: Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate mental illness status and exposure to stressors among 2,839 persons who died by suicide in Victoria, Australia (2009-2013), using the Victorian Suicide Register. Results: Females, metropolitan residents, persons treated for physical illness/injury, those exposed to stressors related to isolation, family, work, education, and substance use and those who had made a previous suicide attempt had increased odds of having a diagnosed mental illness. Employed persons had decreased odds of having a diagnosed mental illness. Limitations: The retrospectivity of data collection as well as the validity and reliability of some of the data may be questionable owing to the potential for recall bias. Conclusion: The point of intervention for suicide prevention cannot always be a mental health professional; some people who die by suicide either do not have a mental illness or have not sought help.

AB - Background: Mental illness is an established risk factor for suicide. To develop effective prevention interventions and strategies, the demographic characteristics and stressors (other than, or in addition to, mental illness) that can influence a person's decision to die by suicide need to be identified. Aim: To examine cases of suicide by the presence or absence of a diagnosed mental illness (mental illness status) to identify differences in factors associated with suicide in the groups. Method: Logistic regression analyses were used to investigate mental illness status and exposure to stressors among 2,839 persons who died by suicide in Victoria, Australia (2009-2013), using the Victorian Suicide Register. Results: Females, metropolitan residents, persons treated for physical illness/injury, those exposed to stressors related to isolation, family, work, education, and substance use and those who had made a previous suicide attempt had increased odds of having a diagnosed mental illness. Employed persons had decreased odds of having a diagnosed mental illness. Limitations: The retrospectivity of data collection as well as the validity and reliability of some of the data may be questionable owing to the potential for recall bias. Conclusion: The point of intervention for suicide prevention cannot always be a mental health professional; some people who die by suicide either do not have a mental illness or have not sought help.

KW - mental illness

KW - suicide

KW - suicide epidemiology

KW - suicide stressors

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U2 - 10.1027/0227-5910/a000553

DO - 10.1027/0227-5910/a000553

M3 - Article

JO - Crisis

JF - Crisis

SN - 0227-5910

ER -