DIABETIC RENAL MICROVASCULAR DISEASE: THE ROLE OF HYPERTENSION AND ACE INHIBITORS

Mark E. Cooper, Jonathan R. Rumble, Trevor Gin, Troy Lim‐Joon

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Abstract

1. It has been suggested that hypertension may be an important determinant of the rate of progression of diabetic microangiopathy. 2. Renal microvascular disease as assessed by urinary albumin excretion and glomerular ultra‐structure was evaluated in a model in which streptozotocin diabetes was induced in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR). 3. Diabetes was associated with increases in urinary albumin excretion, and hypertension resulted in a further increase in albuminuria. 4. Various antihypertensive regimens were administered to diabetic SHR, with the angiotensin‐converting enzyme inhibitor perindopril and triple therapy (hydralazine, reserpine and hydrochlorothiazide) being more effective than the calcium antagonist (lacidipine) in retarding the increase in albuminuria in diabetic SHR. 5. Antihypertensive therapy appears to ameliorate the development of diabetic renal disease.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-27
Number of pages5
JournalClinical and Experimental Pharmacology and Physiology
Volume19
Issue number19 S
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1992
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • albuminuria
  • diabetes
  • hypertension
  • kidney
  • lacidipine
  • nephropathy
  • perindopril

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