Development of a question prompt list for women with polycystic ovary syndrome

Nadia N. Khan, Amanda Vincent, Jacqueline A. Boyle, Millicent Burggraf, Monisha Pillay, Helena Teede, Melanie Gibson-Helm

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To develop a question prompt list (QPL) for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and explore its acceptability and feasibility. Design: Nationwide online survey, interviews, and clinical pilot test. Setting: Australia. Patient(s): Two-hundred and forty-nine women online, 18 women in interviews, and 20 women in clinics. Intervention(s): A QPL for PCOS. Main Outcome Measure(s): From survey, women's likeliness to use a QPL and priority topics; from interview, QPL user-friendliness and associated feelings; from pilot, women's QPL use, perceived helpfulness, and intended future use. Result(s): Evidence-based guidelines and multidisciplinary experts informed the QPL development. Of 249 survey respondents, 66.7% to 68.7% reported difficulty communicating with health care providers about mood, weight management, and how PCOS affects daily life, and 85.8% indicated they were very likely to use a PCOS QPL. Women were interviewed to explore acceptability; the semistructured interviews (n = 18) revealed that the devised QPL was easy to understand, user-friendly, and encouraged information seeking and targeted question asking. The refined QPL was pilot-tested in a clinic setting to explore feasibility between 2016 and 2017: 60.0% of women asked 1 to 2 questions from the QPL, 20.0% asked several questions, and 10.0% reported the QPL helped them generate their own questions. Women agreed the QPL was helpful (95.0%) and that they would use the QPL again (90.0%). Conclusion(s): The PCOS QPL is acceptable and feasible, and may assist women in information seeking and targeted question asking.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)514-522
Number of pages9
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume110
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2018

Keywords

  • Information seeking behavior
  • patient participation
  • polycystic ovary syndrome
  • question prompt list

Cite this

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title = "Development of a question prompt list for women with polycystic ovary syndrome",
abstract = "Objective: To develop a question prompt list (QPL) for women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and explore its acceptability and feasibility. Design: Nationwide online survey, interviews, and clinical pilot test. Setting: Australia. Patient(s): Two-hundred and forty-nine women online, 18 women in interviews, and 20 women in clinics. Intervention(s): A QPL for PCOS. Main Outcome Measure(s): From survey, women's likeliness to use a QPL and priority topics; from interview, QPL user-friendliness and associated feelings; from pilot, women's QPL use, perceived helpfulness, and intended future use. Result(s): Evidence-based guidelines and multidisciplinary experts informed the QPL development. Of 249 survey respondents, 66.7{\%} to 68.7{\%} reported difficulty communicating with health care providers about mood, weight management, and how PCOS affects daily life, and 85.8{\%} indicated they were very likely to use a PCOS QPL. Women were interviewed to explore acceptability; the semistructured interviews (n = 18) revealed that the devised QPL was easy to understand, user-friendly, and encouraged information seeking and targeted question asking. The refined QPL was pilot-tested in a clinic setting to explore feasibility between 2016 and 2017: 60.0{\%} of women asked 1 to 2 questions from the QPL, 20.0{\%} asked several questions, and 10.0{\%} reported the QPL helped them generate their own questions. Women agreed the QPL was helpful (95.0{\%}) and that they would use the QPL again (90.0{\%}). Conclusion(s): The PCOS QPL is acceptable and feasible, and may assist women in information seeking and targeted question asking.",
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Development of a question prompt list for women with polycystic ovary syndrome. / Khan, Nadia N.; Vincent, Amanda; Boyle, Jacqueline A.; Burggraf, Millicent; Pillay, Monisha; Teede, Helena; Gibson-Helm, Melanie.

In: Fertility and Sterility, Vol. 110, No. 3, 01.08.2018, p. 514-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Development of a question prompt list for women with polycystic ovary syndrome

AU - Khan, Nadia N.

AU - Vincent, Amanda

AU - Boyle, Jacqueline A.

AU - Burggraf, Millicent

AU - Pillay, Monisha

AU - Teede, Helena

AU - Gibson-Helm, Melanie

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