Developing a targeted, theory-informed implementation intervention using two theoretical frameworks to address health professional and organisational factors: a case study to improve the management of mild traumatic brain injury in the emergency depa

Emma Jane Tavender, Marije Caroline Bosch, Russell Lindsay Gruen, Sally Elizabeth Green, Susan Michie, Sue Ellen Brennan, Jill J Francis, Jennie Louise Ponsford, Jonathan C Knott, Susanne Meares, Tracy Smyth, Denise Ann O'Connor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the availability of evidence-based guidelines for the management of mild traumatic brain injury in the emergency department (ED), variations in practice exist. Interventions designed to implement recommended behaviours can reduce this variation. Using theory to inform intervention development is advocated; however, there is no consensus on how to select or apply theory. Integrative theoretical frameworks, based on syntheses of theories and theoretical constructs relevant to implementation, have the potential to assist in the intervention development process. This paper describes the process of applying two theoretical frameworks to investigate the factors influencing recommended behaviours and the choice of behaviour change techniques and modes of delivery for an implementation intervention. Methods: A stepped approach was followed: (i) identification of locally applicable and actionable evidence-based recommendations as targets for change, (ii) selection and use of two theoretical frameworks for identifying barriers to and enablers of change (Theoretical Domains Framework and Model of Diffusion of Innovations in Service Organisations) and (iii) identification and operationalisation of intervention components (behaviour change techniques and modes of delivery) to address the barriers and enhance the enablers, informed by theory, evidence and feasibility/acceptability considerations. We illustrate this process in relation to one recommendation, prospective assessment of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) by ED staff using a validated tool. Results: Four recommendations for managing mild traumatic brain injury were targeted with the intervention. The intervention targeting the PTA recommendation consisted of 14 behaviour change techniques and addressed 6 theoretical domains and 5 organisational domains. The mode of delivery was informed by six Cochrane reviews. It was delivered via five intervention components: (i) local stakeholder meetings, (ii) identi
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1 - 22
Number of pages22
JournalImplementation Science
Volume10
Issue numberArt. ID : 74
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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