Developing a measure to understand young children’s Internet cognition and cyber-safety awareness: A pilot test

Susan Edwards, Andrea Nolan, Michael Henderson, Helen Skouteris, Ana Mantilla, Pamela Lambert, Jo Bird

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Advancements in technology have increased preschool children’s access to the Internet. Very little research has been conducted to identify pre-school-aged children’s understandings of the Internet and ramifications of being ‘online’. Without an understanding of children’s thinking about the Internet, it is difficult to provide age- and pedagogically appropriate cyber-safety education. This study developed and pilot-tested an interview schedule that focuses on the Internet thinking and cyber-safety awareness of Australian children aged 4–5 years. The schedule is informed by sociocultural theory, cyber-safety education research and approaches for researching with young children. The schedule shows potential to elicit children’s understandings of the Internet and cyber-safety awareness. Adjustments are required to allow more contextualised responses from children.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)322-335
Number of pages14
JournalEarly Years
Volume36
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jul 2016

Keywords

  • Cyber-safety
  • early childhood education
  • online

Cite this

Edwards, Susan ; Nolan, Andrea ; Henderson, Michael ; Skouteris, Helen ; Mantilla, Ana ; Lambert, Pamela ; Bird, Jo. / Developing a measure to understand young children’s Internet cognition and cyber-safety awareness : A pilot test. In: Early Years. 2016 ; Vol. 36, No. 3. pp. 322-335.
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Developing a measure to understand young children’s Internet cognition and cyber-safety awareness : A pilot test. / Edwards, Susan; Nolan, Andrea; Henderson, Michael; Skouteris, Helen; Mantilla, Ana; Lambert, Pamela; Bird, Jo.

In: Early Years, Vol. 36, No. 3, 02.07.2016, p. 322-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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