Determinants of restenosis and lack of effect of dietary supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid on the incidence of coronary artery restenosis after angioplasty

Leeanne E. Grigg, Thomas W.H. Kay, Peter A. Valentine, Richard Larkins, Dorothy J. Flower, Emmanuel G. Manolas, Kerin O'Dea, Andrew J. Sinclair, John L. Hopper, David Hunt

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Abstract

The effect of an eicosapentaenoic acid-rich encapsulated preparation of fish oil on the incidence of early restenosis after coronary angioplasty was assessed by a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. A total of 108 patients received either 10 capsules of fish oil (1.8 g eicosapentaenoic acid, 1.2 g docosahexaenoic acid) or 10 control capsules (50% olive oil, 50% corn oil), commencing the day before angioplasty and continuing for 4 months after angioplasty, in addition to treatment with aspirin and verapamil. In 101(94%) of the 108 patients, follow-up angiographic or postmortem result was evaluated at a mean (±SD) of 100 (±22) days. Angiographic restenosis was observed in 34% of patients (29% of lesions) in the fish oil-treated group and 33% of patients (31% of lesions) in the control group (no significant difference). The overall incidence of angiographic restenosis was significantly higher in patients with 1) recurrent angina pectoris, 2) a positive exercise test at follow-up after angioplasty, 3) residual stenosis >30% immediately after angioplasty, and 4) dilation of the left anterior descending or right coronary artery. Biochemical investigations showed a greater decrease in the serum triglyceride levels in the fish oil-treated group versus the control group (p < 0.05) but no differences between the two groups in cholesterol levels or platelet counts over the 4 month period. In conclusion, in this study, the administration of fish oil at a dose of 10 capsules/day did not reduce the incidence of early restenosis after coronary angioplasty.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)665-672
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 1989
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

Grigg, Leeanne E. ; Kay, Thomas W.H. ; Valentine, Peter A. ; Larkins, Richard ; Flower, Dorothy J. ; Manolas, Emmanuel G. ; O'Dea, Kerin ; Sinclair, Andrew J. ; Hopper, John L. ; Hunt, David. / Determinants of restenosis and lack of effect of dietary supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid on the incidence of coronary artery restenosis after angioplasty. In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology. 1989 ; Vol. 13, No. 3. pp. 665-672.
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abstract = "The effect of an eicosapentaenoic acid-rich encapsulated preparation of fish oil on the incidence of early restenosis after coronary angioplasty was assessed by a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. A total of 108 patients received either 10 capsules of fish oil (1.8 g eicosapentaenoic acid, 1.2 g docosahexaenoic acid) or 10 control capsules (50{\%} olive oil, 50{\%} corn oil), commencing the day before angioplasty and continuing for 4 months after angioplasty, in addition to treatment with aspirin and verapamil. In 101(94{\%}) of the 108 patients, follow-up angiographic or postmortem result was evaluated at a mean (±SD) of 100 (±22) days. Angiographic restenosis was observed in 34{\%} of patients (29{\%} of lesions) in the fish oil-treated group and 33{\%} of patients (31{\%} of lesions) in the control group (no significant difference). The overall incidence of angiographic restenosis was significantly higher in patients with 1) recurrent angina pectoris, 2) a positive exercise test at follow-up after angioplasty, 3) residual stenosis >30{\%} immediately after angioplasty, and 4) dilation of the left anterior descending or right coronary artery. Biochemical investigations showed a greater decrease in the serum triglyceride levels in the fish oil-treated group versus the control group (p < 0.05) but no differences between the two groups in cholesterol levels or platelet counts over the 4 month period. In conclusion, in this study, the administration of fish oil at a dose of 10 capsules/day did not reduce the incidence of early restenosis after coronary angioplasty.",
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Determinants of restenosis and lack of effect of dietary supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid on the incidence of coronary artery restenosis after angioplasty. / Grigg, Leeanne E.; Kay, Thomas W.H.; Valentine, Peter A.; Larkins, Richard; Flower, Dorothy J.; Manolas, Emmanuel G.; O'Dea, Kerin; Sinclair, Andrew J.; Hopper, John L.; Hunt, David.

In: Journal of the American College of Cardiology, Vol. 13, No. 3, 01.03.1989, p. 665-672.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Grigg, Leeanne E.

AU - Kay, Thomas W.H.

AU - Valentine, Peter A.

AU - Larkins, Richard

AU - Flower, Dorothy J.

AU - Manolas, Emmanuel G.

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AU - Sinclair, Andrew J.

AU - Hopper, John L.

AU - Hunt, David

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N2 - The effect of an eicosapentaenoic acid-rich encapsulated preparation of fish oil on the incidence of early restenosis after coronary angioplasty was assessed by a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. A total of 108 patients received either 10 capsules of fish oil (1.8 g eicosapentaenoic acid, 1.2 g docosahexaenoic acid) or 10 control capsules (50% olive oil, 50% corn oil), commencing the day before angioplasty and continuing for 4 months after angioplasty, in addition to treatment with aspirin and verapamil. In 101(94%) of the 108 patients, follow-up angiographic or postmortem result was evaluated at a mean (±SD) of 100 (±22) days. Angiographic restenosis was observed in 34% of patients (29% of lesions) in the fish oil-treated group and 33% of patients (31% of lesions) in the control group (no significant difference). The overall incidence of angiographic restenosis was significantly higher in patients with 1) recurrent angina pectoris, 2) a positive exercise test at follow-up after angioplasty, 3) residual stenosis >30% immediately after angioplasty, and 4) dilation of the left anterior descending or right coronary artery. Biochemical investigations showed a greater decrease in the serum triglyceride levels in the fish oil-treated group versus the control group (p < 0.05) but no differences between the two groups in cholesterol levels or platelet counts over the 4 month period. In conclusion, in this study, the administration of fish oil at a dose of 10 capsules/day did not reduce the incidence of early restenosis after coronary angioplasty.

AB - The effect of an eicosapentaenoic acid-rich encapsulated preparation of fish oil on the incidence of early restenosis after coronary angioplasty was assessed by a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled study. A total of 108 patients received either 10 capsules of fish oil (1.8 g eicosapentaenoic acid, 1.2 g docosahexaenoic acid) or 10 control capsules (50% olive oil, 50% corn oil), commencing the day before angioplasty and continuing for 4 months after angioplasty, in addition to treatment with aspirin and verapamil. In 101(94%) of the 108 patients, follow-up angiographic or postmortem result was evaluated at a mean (±SD) of 100 (±22) days. Angiographic restenosis was observed in 34% of patients (29% of lesions) in the fish oil-treated group and 33% of patients (31% of lesions) in the control group (no significant difference). The overall incidence of angiographic restenosis was significantly higher in patients with 1) recurrent angina pectoris, 2) a positive exercise test at follow-up after angioplasty, 3) residual stenosis >30% immediately after angioplasty, and 4) dilation of the left anterior descending or right coronary artery. Biochemical investigations showed a greater decrease in the serum triglyceride levels in the fish oil-treated group versus the control group (p < 0.05) but no differences between the two groups in cholesterol levels or platelet counts over the 4 month period. In conclusion, in this study, the administration of fish oil at a dose of 10 capsules/day did not reduce the incidence of early restenosis after coronary angioplasty.

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