Demoralization: a life-preserving diagnosis to make for the severely medically ill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Consistent correlations have been found between demoralization and depression, anxiety, and a desire for hastened death. As clinical depression becomes more severe, the likelihood increases that comorbid demoralization will develop. However, demoralization can certainly occur when anhedonic depression is not present, and moderate demoralization without depression may be relatively common.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)255 - 258
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Palliative Care
Volume30
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Cite this

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title = "Demoralization: a life-preserving diagnosis to make for the severely medically ill",
abstract = "Consistent correlations have been found between demoralization and depression, anxiety, and a desire for hastened death. As clinical depression becomes more severe, the likelihood increases that comorbid demoralization will develop. However, demoralization can certainly occur when anhedonic depression is not present, and moderate demoralization without depression may be relatively common.",
author = "David Kissane",
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volume = "30",
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Demoralization: a life-preserving diagnosis to make for the severely medically ill. / Kissane, David.

In: Journal of Palliative Care, Vol. 30, No. 4, 2014, p. 255 - 258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

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AU - Kissane, David

PY - 2014

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AB - Consistent correlations have been found between demoralization and depression, anxiety, and a desire for hastened death. As clinical depression becomes more severe, the likelihood increases that comorbid demoralization will develop. However, demoralization can certainly occur when anhedonic depression is not present, and moderate demoralization without depression may be relatively common.

UR - http://criugm.qc.ca/journalofpalliativecare/archives/

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 255

EP - 258

JO - Journal of Palliative Care

JF - Journal of Palliative Care

SN - 0825-8597

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