Demoralisation

Its impact on informed consent and medical care

Research output: Contribution to journalComment / DebateOtherpeer-review

Abstract

Demoralisation, a mental state characterised by hopelessness and meaninglessness, can be differentiated from depression in that demoralised patients can enjoy the present, their lack of hope being confined to the future. However, like severe depression, demoralisation can interfere with a person's capacity to give informed consent. Doctors and other health professionals are also subject to demoralisation, which influences medical care.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)537-539
Number of pages3
JournalMedical Journal of Australia
Volume175
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 19 Nov 2001
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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Demoralisation : Its impact on informed consent and medical care. / Kissane, D. W.

In: Medical Journal of Australia, Vol. 175, No. 10, 19.11.2001, p. 537-539.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment / DebateOtherpeer-review

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