Demographic, clinical and lifestyle factors associated with high-intensity statin therapy in Australia

the AusDiab study

Karen Ho, Kris M. Jamsen, J. Simon Bell, Maarit Jaana Korhonen, Kevin P. Mc Namara, Dianna J. Magliano, Danny Liew, Taliesin E. Ryan-Atwood, Jonathan E. Shaw, Susan Luc, Jenni Ilomäki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Clinical guidelines specify who should receive high-intensity statins; however, it is unclear how high-intensity statins are used in Australia. Our objective was to determine the demographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors associated with high-intensity statin therapy in Australia. Methods: Data from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle study collected in 2011–2012 were analyzed. High-, moderate-, and low-intensity statins were defined as use of statins at doses demonstrated to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by > 50, 30–50, and < 30%, respectively. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odd ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for factors associated with high- versus low-to-moderate-intensity statin therapy. Results: Overall, 1108 (24%) study participants used a statin. Data on statin intensity were available for 1072 participants. The proportions of high-, moderate-, and low-intensity statin therapy were 32 (n = 341), 65 (n = 696), and 3% (n = 35), respectively. Overall, 51% of people with prior cardiovascular disease (CVD) used a high-intensity statin. In addition to prior CVD (OR = 3.34, 95% CI = 1.95–5.73), no (OR = 1.84, 95%CI 1.02–3.31) or insufficient physical activity (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.01–2.25), obesity (OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.13–3.10), and consuming > 2 alcoholic drinks daily (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.08–2.55) were associated with high versus low-to-moderate-intensity statin therapy. Conversely, age 65–74 vs. < 65 years was inversely associated with high-intensity statin therapy (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.41–0.94). Conclusions: Prior CVD was the strongest factor associated with high-intensity statin therapy. Although the prevalence of CVD increases with age, older people were less likely to be treated with high-intensity statins.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1493-1501
Number of pages9
JournalEuropean Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Volume74
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Cholesterol
  • Epidemiology
  • HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors

Cite this

@article{e10780e7ab704c08b137f2d3d3299a7d,
title = "Demographic, clinical and lifestyle factors associated with high-intensity statin therapy in Australia: the AusDiab study",
abstract = "Purpose: Clinical guidelines specify who should receive high-intensity statins; however, it is unclear how high-intensity statins are used in Australia. Our objective was to determine the demographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors associated with high-intensity statin therapy in Australia. Methods: Data from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle study collected in 2011–2012 were analyzed. High-, moderate-, and low-intensity statins were defined as use of statins at doses demonstrated to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by > 50, 30–50, and < 30{\%}, respectively. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odd ratios (ORs) and 95{\%} confidence intervals (CIs) for factors associated with high- versus low-to-moderate-intensity statin therapy. Results: Overall, 1108 (24{\%}) study participants used a statin. Data on statin intensity were available for 1072 participants. The proportions of high-, moderate-, and low-intensity statin therapy were 32 (n = 341), 65 (n = 696), and 3{\%} (n = 35), respectively. Overall, 51{\%} of people with prior cardiovascular disease (CVD) used a high-intensity statin. In addition to prior CVD (OR = 3.34, 95{\%} CI = 1.95–5.73), no (OR = 1.84, 95{\%}CI 1.02–3.31) or insufficient physical activity (OR = 1.51, 95{\%} CI = 1.01–2.25), obesity (OR = 1.87, 95{\%} CI = 1.13–3.10), and consuming > 2 alcoholic drinks daily (OR = 1.66, 95{\%} CI = 1.08–2.55) were associated with high versus low-to-moderate-intensity statin therapy. Conversely, age 65–74 vs. < 65 years was inversely associated with high-intensity statin therapy (OR = 0.62, 95{\%} CI = 0.41–0.94). Conclusions: Prior CVD was the strongest factor associated with high-intensity statin therapy. Although the prevalence of CVD increases with age, older people were less likely to be treated with high-intensity statins.",
keywords = "Australia, Cardiovascular disease, Cholesterol, Epidemiology, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors",
author = "Karen Ho and Jamsen, {Kris M.} and Bell, {J. Simon} and Korhonen, {Maarit Jaana} and {Mc Namara}, {Kevin P.} and Magliano, {Dianna J.} and Danny Liew and Ryan-Atwood, {Taliesin E.} and Shaw, {Jonathan E.} and Susan Luc and Jenni Ilom{\"a}ki",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s00228-018-2518-1",
language = "English",
volume = "74",
pages = "1493--1501",
journal = "European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology",
issn = "0031-6970",
publisher = "Springer-Verlag London Ltd.",
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}

Demographic, clinical and lifestyle factors associated with high-intensity statin therapy in Australia : the AusDiab study. / Ho, Karen; Jamsen, Kris M.; Bell, J. Simon; Korhonen, Maarit Jaana; Mc Namara, Kevin P.; Magliano, Dianna J.; Liew, Danny; Ryan-Atwood, Taliesin E.; Shaw, Jonathan E.; Luc, Susan; Ilomäki, Jenni.

In: European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology, Vol. 74, No. 11, 01.11.2018, p. 1493-1501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Demographic, clinical and lifestyle factors associated with high-intensity statin therapy in Australia

T2 - the AusDiab study

AU - Ho, Karen

AU - Jamsen, Kris M.

AU - Bell, J. Simon

AU - Korhonen, Maarit Jaana

AU - Mc Namara, Kevin P.

AU - Magliano, Dianna J.

AU - Liew, Danny

AU - Ryan-Atwood, Taliesin E.

AU - Shaw, Jonathan E.

AU - Luc, Susan

AU - Ilomäki, Jenni

PY - 2018/11/1

Y1 - 2018/11/1

N2 - Purpose: Clinical guidelines specify who should receive high-intensity statins; however, it is unclear how high-intensity statins are used in Australia. Our objective was to determine the demographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors associated with high-intensity statin therapy in Australia. Methods: Data from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle study collected in 2011–2012 were analyzed. High-, moderate-, and low-intensity statins were defined as use of statins at doses demonstrated to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by > 50, 30–50, and < 30%, respectively. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odd ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for factors associated with high- versus low-to-moderate-intensity statin therapy. Results: Overall, 1108 (24%) study participants used a statin. Data on statin intensity were available for 1072 participants. The proportions of high-, moderate-, and low-intensity statin therapy were 32 (n = 341), 65 (n = 696), and 3% (n = 35), respectively. Overall, 51% of people with prior cardiovascular disease (CVD) used a high-intensity statin. In addition to prior CVD (OR = 3.34, 95% CI = 1.95–5.73), no (OR = 1.84, 95%CI 1.02–3.31) or insufficient physical activity (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.01–2.25), obesity (OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.13–3.10), and consuming > 2 alcoholic drinks daily (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.08–2.55) were associated with high versus low-to-moderate-intensity statin therapy. Conversely, age 65–74 vs. < 65 years was inversely associated with high-intensity statin therapy (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.41–0.94). Conclusions: Prior CVD was the strongest factor associated with high-intensity statin therapy. Although the prevalence of CVD increases with age, older people were less likely to be treated with high-intensity statins.

AB - Purpose: Clinical guidelines specify who should receive high-intensity statins; however, it is unclear how high-intensity statins are used in Australia. Our objective was to determine the demographic, clinical, and lifestyle factors associated with high-intensity statin therapy in Australia. Methods: Data from the Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle study collected in 2011–2012 were analyzed. High-, moderate-, and low-intensity statins were defined as use of statins at doses demonstrated to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels by > 50, 30–50, and < 30%, respectively. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odd ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for factors associated with high- versus low-to-moderate-intensity statin therapy. Results: Overall, 1108 (24%) study participants used a statin. Data on statin intensity were available for 1072 participants. The proportions of high-, moderate-, and low-intensity statin therapy were 32 (n = 341), 65 (n = 696), and 3% (n = 35), respectively. Overall, 51% of people with prior cardiovascular disease (CVD) used a high-intensity statin. In addition to prior CVD (OR = 3.34, 95% CI = 1.95–5.73), no (OR = 1.84, 95%CI 1.02–3.31) or insufficient physical activity (OR = 1.51, 95% CI = 1.01–2.25), obesity (OR = 1.87, 95% CI = 1.13–3.10), and consuming > 2 alcoholic drinks daily (OR = 1.66, 95% CI = 1.08–2.55) were associated with high versus low-to-moderate-intensity statin therapy. Conversely, age 65–74 vs. < 65 years was inversely associated with high-intensity statin therapy (OR = 0.62, 95% CI = 0.41–0.94). Conclusions: Prior CVD was the strongest factor associated with high-intensity statin therapy. Although the prevalence of CVD increases with age, older people were less likely to be treated with high-intensity statins.

KW - Australia

KW - Cardiovascular disease

KW - Cholesterol

KW - Epidemiology

KW - HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85050292180&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s00228-018-2518-1

DO - 10.1007/s00228-018-2518-1

M3 - Article

VL - 74

SP - 1493

EP - 1501

JO - European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

JF - European Journal of Clinical Pharmacology

SN - 0031-6970

IS - 11

ER -