Definitions of homework, types of homework, and ratings of the importance of homework among psychologists with cognitive behavior therapy and psychoanalytic theoretical orientations

Nikolaos Kazantzis, Frank M Dattilio

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

A random sample of 827 psychologists were surveyed to assess their definitions of homework, use of homework tasks, and perceived importance of homework. Theoretical orientation distinguished practitioners responses. Cognitive-behavioral therapists defined homework as being closer to empirically supported therapy, whereas psychodynamic therapists rated homework as less characteristic of a process that embraces client responsibility and adaptive skills. Cognitive-behavior therapists did not limit their choices to activitybased tasks, and psychodynamic therapists reported using behavioral tasks sometimes. Monitoring dreams and conscious thought were also used among the entire sample surveyed. Psychodynamic therapists rated homework as somewhat or moderately important, whereas cognitive-behavior therapists more often rated homework as very important. Data suggest some homework may be common to different psychotherapeutic approaches. Findings are discussed in the context of recent theoretical work on homework in psychotherapy and recommendations for future research.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)758 - 773
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Clinical Psychology
Volume66
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
Externally publishedYes

Cite this

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abstract = "A random sample of 827 psychologists were surveyed to assess their definitions of homework, use of homework tasks, and perceived importance of homework. Theoretical orientation distinguished practitioners responses. Cognitive-behavioral therapists defined homework as being closer to empirically supported therapy, whereas psychodynamic therapists rated homework as less characteristic of a process that embraces client responsibility and adaptive skills. Cognitive-behavior therapists did not limit their choices to activitybased tasks, and psychodynamic therapists reported using behavioral tasks sometimes. Monitoring dreams and conscious thought were also used among the entire sample surveyed. Psychodynamic therapists rated homework as somewhat or moderately important, whereas cognitive-behavior therapists more often rated homework as very important. Data suggest some homework may be common to different psychotherapeutic approaches. Findings are discussed in the context of recent theoretical work on homework in psychotherapy and recommendations for future research.",
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AB - A random sample of 827 psychologists were surveyed to assess their definitions of homework, use of homework tasks, and perceived importance of homework. Theoretical orientation distinguished practitioners responses. Cognitive-behavioral therapists defined homework as being closer to empirically supported therapy, whereas psychodynamic therapists rated homework as less characteristic of a process that embraces client responsibility and adaptive skills. Cognitive-behavior therapists did not limit their choices to activitybased tasks, and psychodynamic therapists reported using behavioral tasks sometimes. Monitoring dreams and conscious thought were also used among the entire sample surveyed. Psychodynamic therapists rated homework as somewhat or moderately important, whereas cognitive-behavior therapists more often rated homework as very important. Data suggest some homework may be common to different psychotherapeutic approaches. Findings are discussed in the context of recent theoretical work on homework in psychotherapy and recommendations for future research.

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