Daily exercises and education for preventing low back pain in children: cluster randomized controlled trial

Julia Jane Hill, Jennifer Lyn Keating

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background. Children report low back pain (LBP) as young as 8 years. Preventing LBP in children may prevent or delay adult incidence. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine whether education and daily exercise affect LBP episodes in children compared with education alone. Design. This was a prospective, multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting. The study was conducted at 7 New Zealand primary schools. Participants. Children (n 708), aged 8 to 11 years, from 7 schools stratified by sample size (36, 114, 151, 168, 113, 45, 83) were randomized and allocated to 2 masked groups: intervention (4 schools, n 469) or control (3 schools, n 239). Interventions. Participants in the intervention group were taught 4 spinal movements for daily practice. Both groups participated in education that emphasized back awareness . Measurements. Low back pain history at baseline was assessed. Children reported episodes of LBP during the previous week on trial days 7, 21, 49, 105, 161, and 270. Analysis was at the individual participant level, with adjustment for school clusters.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)507 - 516
Number of pages10
JournalPhysical Therapy
Volume95
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Cite this

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title = "Daily exercises and education for preventing low back pain in children: cluster randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Background. Children report low back pain (LBP) as young as 8 years. Preventing LBP in children may prevent or delay adult incidence. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine whether education and daily exercise affect LBP episodes in children compared with education alone. Design. This was a prospective, multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting. The study was conducted at 7 New Zealand primary schools. Participants. Children (n 708), aged 8 to 11 years, from 7 schools stratified by sample size (36, 114, 151, 168, 113, 45, 83) were randomized and allocated to 2 masked groups: intervention (4 schools, n 469) or control (3 schools, n 239). Interventions. Participants in the intervention group were taught 4 spinal movements for daily practice. Both groups participated in education that emphasized back awareness . Measurements. Low back pain history at baseline was assessed. Children reported episodes of LBP during the previous week on trial days 7, 21, 49, 105, 161, and 270. Analysis was at the individual participant level, with adjustment for school clusters.",
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Daily exercises and education for preventing low back pain in children: cluster randomized controlled trial. / Hill, Julia Jane; Keating, Jennifer Lyn.

In: Physical Therapy, Vol. 95, No. 4, 2015, p. 507 - 516.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Daily exercises and education for preventing low back pain in children: cluster randomized controlled trial

AU - Hill, Julia Jane

AU - Keating, Jennifer Lyn

PY - 2015

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N2 - Background. Children report low back pain (LBP) as young as 8 years. Preventing LBP in children may prevent or delay adult incidence. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine whether education and daily exercise affect LBP episodes in children compared with education alone. Design. This was a prospective, multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting. The study was conducted at 7 New Zealand primary schools. Participants. Children (n 708), aged 8 to 11 years, from 7 schools stratified by sample size (36, 114, 151, 168, 113, 45, 83) were randomized and allocated to 2 masked groups: intervention (4 schools, n 469) or control (3 schools, n 239). Interventions. Participants in the intervention group were taught 4 spinal movements for daily practice. Both groups participated in education that emphasized back awareness . Measurements. Low back pain history at baseline was assessed. Children reported episodes of LBP during the previous week on trial days 7, 21, 49, 105, 161, and 270. Analysis was at the individual participant level, with adjustment for school clusters.

AB - Background. Children report low back pain (LBP) as young as 8 years. Preventing LBP in children may prevent or delay adult incidence. Objectives. The purpose of this study was to determine whether education and daily exercise affect LBP episodes in children compared with education alone. Design. This was a prospective, multicenter cluster randomized controlled trial. Setting. The study was conducted at 7 New Zealand primary schools. Participants. Children (n 708), aged 8 to 11 years, from 7 schools stratified by sample size (36, 114, 151, 168, 113, 45, 83) were randomized and allocated to 2 masked groups: intervention (4 schools, n 469) or control (3 schools, n 239). Interventions. Participants in the intervention group were taught 4 spinal movements for daily practice. Both groups participated in education that emphasized back awareness . Measurements. Low back pain history at baseline was assessed. Children reported episodes of LBP during the previous week on trial days 7, 21, 49, 105, 161, and 270. Analysis was at the individual participant level, with adjustment for school clusters.

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