Cross cultural aesthetics and etiquette

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

Abstract

In transferring an object created by an Indigenous person into a museum or gallery we generally reclassify it as art, foregrounding the artists’ skills and use of materials. This has been assumed to be a sign of respect. Yet it is also apparent that the artistic and aesthetic qualities that we admire about the objects from other cultures, religions and other periods of history are not necessarily the predominant feature for the creators of those objects. In fact, the creators or guardians of such objects may object to the re-contextualisation that such admiration entails. In such a situation, aesthetic and ethical or political values conflict. This chapter analyses the normative and aesthetic features of the contexts in which the exchange occurs of ‘inalienable possessions’: those objects closely bound with identity. It argues that if aesthetic appreciation has the capacity to create communities of understanding and respect, as has been claimed for it, then this involves an imaginative engagement with the ceremonial contexts for which such objects were produced, including the etiquette of those contexts.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSocial Aesthetics and Moral Judgment
Subtitle of host publicationPleasure, Reflection and Accountability
EditorsJennifer McMahon
Place of PublicationAbingdon Oxon UK
PublisherRoutledge
Chapter10
Pages180-195
Number of pages16
ISBN (Electronic)9781315148496
ISBN (Print)9781138553262
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Keywords

  • Cross cultural aesthetics
  • etiquette
  • ceremony
  • Indigenous art
  • museum collections
  • inalienable possession
  • gift exchange
  • fine art
  • everyday aesthetics
  • social aesthetics

Cite this

Coleman, E. B. (2018). Cross cultural aesthetics and etiquette. In J. McMahon (Ed.), Social Aesthetics and Moral Judgment: Pleasure, Reflection and Accountability (pp. 180-195). Abingdon Oxon UK: Routledge.
Coleman, Elizabeth Burns. / Cross cultural aesthetics and etiquette. Social Aesthetics and Moral Judgment: Pleasure, Reflection and Accountability. editor / Jennifer McMahon. Abingdon Oxon UK : Routledge, 2018. pp. 180-195
@inbook{0a7f44c950eb4deba25bb030c7314573,
title = "Cross cultural aesthetics and etiquette",
abstract = "In transferring an object created by an Indigenous person into a museum or gallery we generally reclassify it as art, foregrounding the artists’ skills and use of materials. This has been assumed to be a sign of respect. Yet it is also apparent that the artistic and aesthetic qualities that we admire about the objects from other cultures, religions and other periods of history are not necessarily the predominant feature for the creators of those objects. In fact, the creators or guardians of such objects may object to the re-contextualisation that such admiration entails. In such a situation, aesthetic and ethical or political values conflict. This chapter analyses the normative and aesthetic features of the contexts in which the exchange occurs of ‘inalienable possessions’: those objects closely bound with identity. It argues that if aesthetic appreciation has the capacity to create communities of understanding and respect, as has been claimed for it, then this involves an imaginative engagement with the ceremonial contexts for which such objects were produced, including the etiquette of those contexts.",
keywords = "Cross cultural aesthetics, etiquette, ceremony, Indigenous art, museum collections, inalienable possession, gift exchange, fine art, everyday aesthetics, social aesthetics",
author = "Coleman, {Elizabeth Burns}",
note = "Elizabeth Burns Coleman undertook her Phd in philosophy at the Australian National University. She has held two postdoctoral fellowships, the first at the ANU's Center for Cross Cultural Research, and the second at Monash University, jointly in the Philosophy and Communication programs. She is author of Aboriginal Art, Identity and Appropriation (Sage 2005), numerous chapters and articles on the aesthetics and indigenous art, as well as a contributor to the Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anthropology on cross cultural aesthetics. Her current research explores the aesthetic, ethical and political implications of politeness and civility.",
year = "2018",
language = "English",
isbn = "9781138553262",
pages = "180--195",
editor = "Jennifer McMahon",
booktitle = "Social Aesthetics and Moral Judgment",
publisher = "Routledge",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

Coleman, EB 2018, Cross cultural aesthetics and etiquette. in J McMahon (ed.), Social Aesthetics and Moral Judgment: Pleasure, Reflection and Accountability. Routledge, Abingdon Oxon UK, pp. 180-195.

Cross cultural aesthetics and etiquette. / Coleman, Elizabeth Burns.

Social Aesthetics and Moral Judgment: Pleasure, Reflection and Accountability. ed. / Jennifer McMahon. Abingdon Oxon UK : Routledge, 2018. p. 180-195.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (Book)Researchpeer-review

TY - CHAP

T1 - Cross cultural aesthetics and etiquette

AU - Coleman, Elizabeth Burns

N1 - Elizabeth Burns Coleman undertook her Phd in philosophy at the Australian National University. She has held two postdoctoral fellowships, the first at the ANU's Center for Cross Cultural Research, and the second at Monash University, jointly in the Philosophy and Communication programs. She is author of Aboriginal Art, Identity and Appropriation (Sage 2005), numerous chapters and articles on the aesthetics and indigenous art, as well as a contributor to the Wiley Blackwell Encyclopedia of Anthropology on cross cultural aesthetics. Her current research explores the aesthetic, ethical and political implications of politeness and civility.

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - In transferring an object created by an Indigenous person into a museum or gallery we generally reclassify it as art, foregrounding the artists’ skills and use of materials. This has been assumed to be a sign of respect. Yet it is also apparent that the artistic and aesthetic qualities that we admire about the objects from other cultures, religions and other periods of history are not necessarily the predominant feature for the creators of those objects. In fact, the creators or guardians of such objects may object to the re-contextualisation that such admiration entails. In such a situation, aesthetic and ethical or political values conflict. This chapter analyses the normative and aesthetic features of the contexts in which the exchange occurs of ‘inalienable possessions’: those objects closely bound with identity. It argues that if aesthetic appreciation has the capacity to create communities of understanding and respect, as has been claimed for it, then this involves an imaginative engagement with the ceremonial contexts for which such objects were produced, including the etiquette of those contexts.

AB - In transferring an object created by an Indigenous person into a museum or gallery we generally reclassify it as art, foregrounding the artists’ skills and use of materials. This has been assumed to be a sign of respect. Yet it is also apparent that the artistic and aesthetic qualities that we admire about the objects from other cultures, religions and other periods of history are not necessarily the predominant feature for the creators of those objects. In fact, the creators or guardians of such objects may object to the re-contextualisation that such admiration entails. In such a situation, aesthetic and ethical or political values conflict. This chapter analyses the normative and aesthetic features of the contexts in which the exchange occurs of ‘inalienable possessions’: those objects closely bound with identity. It argues that if aesthetic appreciation has the capacity to create communities of understanding and respect, as has been claimed for it, then this involves an imaginative engagement with the ceremonial contexts for which such objects were produced, including the etiquette of those contexts.

KW - Cross cultural aesthetics

KW - etiquette

KW - ceremony

KW - Indigenous art

KW - museum collections

KW - inalienable possession

KW - gift exchange

KW - fine art

KW - everyday aesthetics

KW - social aesthetics

M3 - Chapter (Book)

SN - 9781138553262

SP - 180

EP - 195

BT - Social Aesthetics and Moral Judgment

A2 - McMahon, Jennifer

PB - Routledge

CY - Abingdon Oxon UK

ER -

Coleman EB. Cross cultural aesthetics and etiquette. In McMahon J, editor, Social Aesthetics and Moral Judgment: Pleasure, Reflection and Accountability. Abingdon Oxon UK: Routledge. 2018. p. 180-195