Cost of Living with Parkinson's Disease over 12 Months in Australia: A Prospective Cohort Study

Shalika Bohingamu Mudiyanselage, Jennifer J. Watts, Julie Abimanyi-Ochom, Lisa Lane, Anna T. Murphy, Meg E Morris, Robert Iansek

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Abstract

Background. Parkinson disease (PD) is a costly chronic condition in terms of managing both motor and nonmotor symptoms. The burden of disease is high for individuals, caregivers, and the health system. The aim of this study is to estimate the annual cost of PD from the household, health system, and societal perspectives. Methods. A prospective cohort study of newly referred people with PD to a specialist PD clinic in Melbourne, Australia. Participants completed baseline and monthly health resource use questionnaires and Medicare data were collected over 12 months. Results. 87 patients completed the 12-month follow-up assessments. The mean annual cost per person to the health care system was $32,556 AUD. The burden to society was an additional $45,000 per annum per person with PD. The largest component of health system costs were for hospitalisation (69% of total costs). The costs for people with moderate to severe disease were almost 4 times those with mild PD ($63,569 versus $17,537 p<0.001). Conclusion. PD is associated with significant costs to individuals and to society. Costs escalated with disease severity suggesting that the burden to society is likely to grow with the increasing disease prevalence that is associated with population ageing.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5932675
Number of pages13
JournalParkinson's Disease
Volume2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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