Convergent evolution in toothed whale cochleae

Travis Park, Bastien Mennecart, Loïc Costeur, Camille Grohé, Natalie Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Odontocetes (toothed whales) are the most species-rich marine mammal lineage. The catalyst for their evolutionary success is echolocation- A form of biological sonar that uses high-frequency sound, produced in the forehead and ultimately detected by the cochlea. The ubiquity of echolocation in odontocetes across a wide range of physical and acoustic environments suggests that convergent evolution of cochlear shape is likely to have occurred. To test this, we used SURFACE; a method that fits Ornstein-Uhlenbeck (OU) models with stepwise AIC (Akaike Information Criterion) to identify convergent regimes on the odontocete phylogeny, and then tested whether convergence in these regimes was significantly greater than expected by chance. Results: We identified three convergent regimes: (1) True's (Mesoplodon mirus) and Cuvier's (Ziphius cavirostris) beaked whales; (2) sperm whales (Physeter macrocephalus) and all other beaked whales sampled; and (3) pygmy (Kogia breviceps) and dwarf (Kogia sima) sperm whales and Dall's porpoise (Phocoenoides dalli). Interestingly the 'river dolphins', a group notorious for their convergent morphologies and riverine ecologies, do not have convergent cochlear shapes. The first two regimes were significantly convergent, with habitat type and dive type significantly correlated with membership of the sperm whale + beaked whale regime. Conclusions: The extreme acoustic environment of the deep ocean likely constrains cochlear shape, causing the cochlear morphology of sperm and beaked whales to converge. This study adds support for cochlear morphology being used to predict the ecology of extinct cetaceans.

Original languageEnglish
Article number195
Number of pages11
JournalBMC Evolutionary Biology
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Oct 2019
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Convergence
  • Echolocation
  • Ecomorphology
  • Inner ear
  • Odontoceti
  • Phylogenetic comparative methods

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