Controlling the fire--tissue-specific mechanisms of effector regulatory T-cell homing

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16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Regulatory T cells have essential roles in regulating immune responses and limiting inappropriate inflammation. Evidence now indicates that to achieve this function, regulatory T cells must be able to migrate to the most appropriate locations within both lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs. This function is achieved via the spatiotemporally controlled expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, varying according to the developmental stage of the regulatory T cell and the location and environment where they undergo activation. In this Review, we summarise information on the roles of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors in mediating regulatory T-cell migration and function throughout the body under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. In addition, we review recent studies that have used in vivo imaging to examine the actions of regulatory T cells in vivo, in lymph nodes, in the microvasculature and in the interstitium of peripheral organs. These studies reveal that the capacity of regulatory T cells to undergo selective migration serves a critical role in their ability to suppress immune responses. As such, the cellular and molecular requirements of regulatory T-cell migration need to be completely understood to enable the most effective use of these cells in clinical settings.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)355 - 363
Number of pages9
JournalImmunology and Cell Biology
Volume93
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Cite this

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title = "Controlling the fire--tissue-specific mechanisms of effector regulatory T-cell homing",
abstract = "Regulatory T cells have essential roles in regulating immune responses and limiting inappropriate inflammation. Evidence now indicates that to achieve this function, regulatory T cells must be able to migrate to the most appropriate locations within both lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs. This function is achieved via the spatiotemporally controlled expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, varying according to the developmental stage of the regulatory T cell and the location and environment where they undergo activation. In this Review, we summarise information on the roles of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors in mediating regulatory T-cell migration and function throughout the body under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. In addition, we review recent studies that have used in vivo imaging to examine the actions of regulatory T cells in vivo, in lymph nodes, in the microvasculature and in the interstitium of peripheral organs. These studies reveal that the capacity of regulatory T cells to undergo selective migration serves a critical role in their ability to suppress immune responses. As such, the cellular and molecular requirements of regulatory T-cell migration need to be completely understood to enable the most effective use of these cells in clinical settings.",
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Controlling the fire--tissue-specific mechanisms of effector regulatory T-cell homing. / Chow, Zachary; Banerjee, Ashish; Hickey, Michael John.

In: Immunology and Cell Biology, Vol. 93, No. 4, 2015, p. 355 - 363.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Banerjee, Ashish

AU - Hickey, Michael John

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AB - Regulatory T cells have essential roles in regulating immune responses and limiting inappropriate inflammation. Evidence now indicates that to achieve this function, regulatory T cells must be able to migrate to the most appropriate locations within both lymphoid and non-lymphoid organs. This function is achieved via the spatiotemporally controlled expression of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors, varying according to the developmental stage of the regulatory T cell and the location and environment where they undergo activation. In this Review, we summarise information on the roles of adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors in mediating regulatory T-cell migration and function throughout the body under homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. In addition, we review recent studies that have used in vivo imaging to examine the actions of regulatory T cells in vivo, in lymph nodes, in the microvasculature and in the interstitium of peripheral organs. These studies reveal that the capacity of regulatory T cells to undergo selective migration serves a critical role in their ability to suppress immune responses. As such, the cellular and molecular requirements of regulatory T-cell migration need to be completely understood to enable the most effective use of these cells in clinical settings.

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