Concerns About Claiming, Postclaim Support, and Return to Work Planning: The Workplace's Impact on Return to Work

Shannon Gray, Luke Riley Sheehan, Tyler Jeremiah Lane, Arif Jetha, Alexander Collie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine how injured Australian workers perceived employer emotional (eg, empathy) and instrumental [eg, return-to-work (RTW) planning] support during the RTW process and examine associations between support and RTW. METHODS: Using data from the 2014 National Return to Work Survey of injured workers with a workers' compensation claim, multinomial regression models examined relationships between support and RTW. RESULTS: Receiving support and developing RTW plans were significantly associated with a greater likelihood of RTW. When controlled for one another in a single model, postclaim support had the strongest association with RTW, with RTW planning also significantly and positively associated with RTW. CONCLUSION: Provision of both emotional and instrumental support are important employer-led work disability management interventions. Research is required to develop strategies for increasing employer support to lead to improved RTW outcomes for injured workers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e139-e145
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume61
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019

Cite this

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title = "Concerns About Claiming, Postclaim Support, and Return to Work Planning: The Workplace's Impact on Return to Work",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to determine how injured Australian workers perceived employer emotional (eg, empathy) and instrumental [eg, return-to-work (RTW) planning] support during the RTW process and examine associations between support and RTW. METHODS: Using data from the 2014 National Return to Work Survey of injured workers with a workers' compensation claim, multinomial regression models examined relationships between support and RTW. RESULTS: Receiving support and developing RTW plans were significantly associated with a greater likelihood of RTW. When controlled for one another in a single model, postclaim support had the strongest association with RTW, with RTW planning also significantly and positively associated with RTW. CONCLUSION: Provision of both emotional and instrumental support are important employer-led work disability management interventions. Research is required to develop strategies for increasing employer support to lead to improved RTW outcomes for injured workers.",
author = "Shannon Gray and Sheehan, {Luke Riley} and Lane, {Tyler Jeremiah} and Arif Jetha and Alexander Collie",
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Concerns About Claiming, Postclaim Support, and Return to Work Planning : The Workplace's Impact on Return to Work. / Gray, Shannon; Sheehan, Luke Riley; Lane, Tyler Jeremiah; Jetha, Arif; Collie, Alexander.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 61, No. 4, 01.04.2019, p. e139-e145.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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AU - Jetha, Arif

AU - Collie, Alexander

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